Latest Women's Health News

Hair Loss, Fibroids May Have Links in Black Women 5Jan
2018

Hair Loss, Fibroids May Have Links in Black Women

FRIDAY, Jan. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Black women with a relatively common form of hair loss may also face a high risk for developing fibroids, a new study suggests. Fibroids are fibrous growths that develop in...
Exercise Boosts Kids' Brain Health, Too

Exercise Boosts Kids' Brain Health, Too

5 January 2018
FRIDAY, Jan. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A lack of exercise puts kids at risk for very adult problems, like obesity and diabetes. Now there's also research that links exercise to their cognitive development and...
FRIDAY, Jan. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A lack of exercise puts kids at risk for very adult problems, like obesity and diabetes. Now there's also research that links exercise to their cognitive development and achievement in school. Turns out that physical activity gives the young brain needed boosts, according to a study published in Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development. Active children do better in class and on tests because exercise seems to lead to larger brain volumes in areas associated with memory and thinking functions, such as behavior and decision-making. Active kids also appear to have better concentration and longer attention spans -- being fit helps them stay focused to complete assignments, the study authors reported. These findings appear to be...
Childbirth Deaths Declining in U.S., New Report Finds

Childbirth Deaths Declining in U.S., New Report Finds

4 January 2018
THURSDAY, Jan. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Improved management of excessive bleeding and high blood pressure during labor and delivery are helping to reduce the number of childbirth-related deaths in the United...
THURSDAY, Jan. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Improved management of excessive bleeding and high blood pressure during labor and delivery are helping to reduce the number of childbirth-related deaths in the United States, maternal health experts say. A new report, from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), reflected initial findings from a national initiative to reduce complications and deaths during childbirth. "For every maternal death, we know there are about 100 episodes of severe maternal morbidity," said Dr. Barbara Levy, referring to health conditions that affect pregnancy and childbirth. Levy is ACOG's vice president for health policy. "Chronic conditions such as high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity and diabetes are some of the leading causes...
More U.S. Women Obese Before Pregnancy, Experts Sound...

More U.S. Women Obese Before Pregnancy, Experts Sound...

4 January 2018
THURSDAY, Jan. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Prepregnancy weights continue to rise in the United States, with less than half of women at a healthy size before conception, U.S. health officials report. Pregnancy...
THURSDAY, Jan. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Prepregnancy weights continue to rise in the United States, with less than half of women at a healthy size before conception, U.S. health officials report. Pregnancy experts fear this trend may threaten the health of mothers and their babies. "As the American population increases in size, we are now seeing more and more women starting pregnancy at unhealthy weights," said Dr. Jennifer Wu, an ob-gyn at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "This poses risks for them during pregnancy, and it also increases risks for their babies." And the health consequences will not end when the pregnancy ends, Wu added. "Unfortunately, many of these women will gain too much during their pregnancies and will not lose their pregnancy weight," she...
U.S. Cancer Deaths Steadily Dropping: Report
4 January 2018

U.S. Cancer Deaths Steadily Dropping: Report

THURSDAY, Jan. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Better cancer detection and treatments, not to mention lots of people quitting smoking, have fueled a 20-year drop in deaths from the disease, a new report shows. That means more than 2 million lives have been saved, the American Cancer Society statistics indicate. "It's pretty staggering that 2.4 million deaths have been avoided over the past 20 years," said Dr. Eva Chalas, director of NYU Winthrop's Cancer Center in Mineola, N.Y. "It's exciting to see the numbers coming down. We're making strides, and we have much more to offer people," added Chalas, who was not involved in the study. From 2014 to 2015, the cancer death rate went down 1.7 percent. The decline in cancer death rates began in 1991, and since that time it has dropped by 26...
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