Latest Women's Health News

8Apr
2021

Women More Prone to Concussion's Long-Term Harms: Study

Women More Prone to Concussion`s Long-Term Harms: StudyTHURSDAY, April 8, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- After a concussion, women may be at heightened risk of lasting physical and mental symptoms, a new study finds.The study of 2,000 concussion sufferers found that women were more likely than men to still have some symptoms one year later. The problems included fuzzy memory and difficulty concentrating, as well as headaches, dizziness or fatigue.In contrast, women and men showed similar recovery times after traumatic injuries to other areas of the body.The reasons are unclear, but the study is not the first to find sex differences in concussion recovery. Many have found that on average, women improve more slowly post-concussion, regardless of what caused the injury.But the new study also included a "control" group of people who had suffered...

Do You 'Wolf Down' Your Food? Speedy Eaters May Pack on...

7 April 2021
Do You `Wolf Down` Your Food? Speedy Eaters May Pack on More PoundsWEDNESDAY, April 7, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Are you the type to linger over a meal, or do you tend to eat quickly without giving it much thought?New research confirms that you're better off going the slow route, because fast eaters tend to consume more and be more vulnerable to gaining weight and becoming obese. And it uncovers a new wrinkle: If you grew up with siblings, where you probably had to compete for whatever was on the table, you're more likely to be a fast eater.Speedy eating makes you prone to eating more because it takes a bit of time for your body to recognize that you're starting to feel full, explained Connie Diekman, a St. Louis-based registered dietitian and former president of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics."We don't recognize that feeling of fullness...

Why So Many New Cancer Diagnoses When Americans Turn 65?

7 April 2021
Why So Many New Cancer Diagnoses When Americans Turn 65?WEDNESDAY, April 7, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- A few years ago, Dr. Joseph Shrager, a professor of cardiothoracic surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine, noticed that lung cancer diagnoses were noticeably higher at age 65 than at slightly older or younger ages."There was no reason rates should differ much between the ages of 63 and 65," Shrager said.He discussed this with his colleagues, who said they were seeing something similar. "We decided to explore this, and its broader implications, in a larger population," Shrager said in a Stanford news release.What did they find in their study? A sudden jump in cancer cases among Americans at age 65 may be due to the fact that many older adults delay care until they have Medicare coverage.To arrive at this conclusion, the team...

Mammogram Rates Have Rebounded Since Pandemic Began, But...

6 April 2021
Mammogram Rates Have Rebounded Since Pandemic Began, But Concerns RemainTUESDAY, April 6, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- When the pandemic first hit last spring, screening mammograms fell by the wayside as COVID-19 became the most pressing medical concern in the country, but U.S. testing rates rebounded by mid-summer, a new study shows.But even though things have returned to normal, it still hasn't been enough to make up for those three months of delays, the researchers noted.Investigators from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Coalition, a federally funded, national network of breast imaging registries, found there was a near cessation of mammograms in mid-March 2020. In April 2020, screening mammography was at only 1% of expected volume, based on historical numbers. By July, that had rebounded to about 90% of pre-pandemic rates. Diagnostic mammograms, those that...

COVID Shot Earlier in Pregnancy Better for Baby: Study

6 April 2021
COVID Shot Earlier in Pregnancy Better for Baby: StudyTUESDAY, March 6, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The sooner a pregnant woman gets a COVID-19 vaccine, the more likely she is to transfer protective antibodies to her baby, a new, small study suggests."This just gives extra fuel for people who are on the fence or just think, 'Maybe I'll wait until after I deliver,'" said study co-author Dr. Emily Miller. She's an assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology and a maternal fetal medicine physician at Northwestern University School of Medicine."We strongly recommend you get the vaccine while pregnant. But if you're fearing vaccination might harm the baby, these data tell us quite the opposite. The vaccine is a mechanism to protect your baby, and the sooner you get it, the better," Miller said in a university news release.The researchers...
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