Latest Women's Health News

30Jan
2023

Smoking in Pregnancy Greatly Raises Odds for SIDS in Newborns

Smoking in Pregnancy Greatly Raises Odds for SIDS in NewbornsMONDAY, Jan. 30, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Infants exposed to maternal smoking during pregnancy are more than five times more likely to die unexpectedly compared to babies of nonsmokers, a new study says."The message is simple. Smoking greatly elevates the risk of sudden unexpected infant death," said lead study author Barbara Ostfeld, program director of the SIDS Center of New Jersey and a professor of pediatrics at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in New Brunswick, N.J."Everyone who plans to get pregnant has a profoundly important reason to quit," Ostfeld said in a school news release.Each year, about 3,400 sudden unexpected infant deaths (SUID) occur in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. These deaths occur in an infant's first...

U.S. Parents Face Big Disparities in Access to Autism...

30 January 2023
U.S. Parents Face Big Disparities in Access to Autism Care ServicesMONDAY, Jan. 30, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Autism services are harder to find in many of the places where Black, Hispanic and Native American families live, new research shows.It's known that there are racial disparities in U.S. families' receipt of autism services — ranging from diagnosis and behavioral therapy to school and community programs.The new study highlights one reason: Those services are simply more scarce in the communities where Black, Hispanic and Native American families live. It also points to specific geographic regions in the United States where disparities are most stark.That could help in targeting resources to the areas in greatest need, according to the researchers."It's a simple study that essentially creates a map," said senior researcher Dennis Wall, a...

Breast Pain Doesn't Always Mean Cancer: When to Get a...

27 January 2023
Breast Pain Doesn`t Always Mean Cancer: When to Get a MammogramFRIDAY, Jan. 27, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- While anyone can experience breast pain, don't panic: It’s rarely cancer.Penn State Health offers some reassurance about what might cause the pain and when it might be time to have a mammogram.“We see a lot of patients who come looking for answers that have widespread, cyclical breast pain,” said Dr. Alison Chetlen, a staff physician at Penn State Health Breast Center in Hershey, Pa.“We usually start with reassurance, perhaps eliminating the underlying cause of the pain," she said in a Penn news release. "Sometimes it is related to their menstrual cycle or underlying hormonal fluctuations. Is it musculoskeletal? If so, perhaps medication and a warm compress will help. Something like arthritis of the rib joints also can cause pain that...

Fiber: It's Important to Your Child's Diet, Too

27 January 2023
Fiber: It`s Important to Your Child`s Diet, TooFRIDAY, Jan. 27, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Just like adults, children need lots of fiber in their diets.Fiber is part of what fuels a child’s normal growth and development. It helps them feel full longer, controls blood sugar levels, reduces cholesterol and promotes regular bowel movements, according to Children's Health of Orange County, Calif. (CHOC)."We see improvements in disease management like diabetes with lower spikes in blood sugar after meals when fiber intake is adequate. Improved satisfaction and satiety from the food we are consuming is evident when they contain more fiber, and this ultimately impacts weight management," said Stephanie Di Figlia-Peck, nutrition coordinator at Cohen Children’s Medical Center in New York City.A child who is still hungry will continue to...

Siblings of Babies Who Died of SIDS May Also Face Higher Risk

26 January 2023
Siblings of Babies Who Died of SIDS May Also Face Higher RiskTHURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have long struggled to figure out what causes a seemingly healthy baby to die suddenly in the first year of life, with an array of possible genetic and environmental factors to choose from.Now a large, Danish study has found that in families where one child has succumbed to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), a younger sibling’s risk appears to quadruple.“I am not very surprised by these findings,” said Dr. Michael Goodstein, a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics Task Force on SIDS, who reviewed the study.Goodstein, division chief of newborn medicine with WellSpan Health in York, Pa., noted that “other studies, including ones in the U.S. and the U.K., have shown a small but real increase in the risk of SIDS for...
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