Latest Women's Health News

6Jan
2021

Women May Transmit Cancer to Infants in Childbirth, Reports Suggest

Women May Transmit Cancer to Infants in Childbirth, Reports SuggestWEDNESDAY, Jan. 6, 2021 -- In extremely rare instances, newborns can contract cancer from their pregnant moms during delivery, a new case report suggests.Two boys, a 23-month-old and a 6-year-old, developed lung cancers that proved an exact genetic match to cervical cancers within their mothers at the time of birth, Japanese researchers report.It appears that the boys breathed in cancer cells from their mothers' tumors while they were being born, cancer experts say."In our cases, we think that tumors arose from mother-to-infant vaginal transmission through aspiration of tumor-contaminated vaginal fluids during birth," said lead researcher Dr. Ayumu Arakawa, a pediatric oncologist with the National Cancer Center Hospital in Tokyo.Transmission of cancer from a mom to her offspring is a...

Pediatricians' Group Says School Is Priority, With...

6 January 2021
Pediatricians` Group Says School Is Priority, With Proper Safety MeasuresWEDNESDAY, Jan. 6, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- A prominent U.S. doctors' group reaffirmed its recommendation this week that having kids physically in school should be the goal, while also outlining safety protocols needed to allow schools to be open.In its COVID-19 guidance for safe schools, the American Academy of Pediatrics listed measures communities need to address. These include controlling the spread of COVID-19 in the community, protecting staff and students in schools and coordinating closely with local and state health experts. "New information tells us that opening schools does not significantly increase community transmission of the virus. However, it is critical for schools to closely follow guidance provided by public health officials," said Dr. Lee Beers, new president of...

Kids With Congenital Heart Disease Face Higher Odds of...

5 January 2021
Kids With Congenital Heart Disease Face Higher Odds of Mental Health IssuesTUESDAY, Jan. 5, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Kids born with heart defects may be more likely to develop anxiety, depression and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), regardless of the severity of their heart condition.Congenital heart defects are the most common type of birth defect in the United States, affecting about 40,000 babies a year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The defects range from mild to severe and sometimes require immediate or multiple surgeries. These children often miss school and social activities due to doctors' visits or health restrictions.For the study, the researchers reviewed medical records of close to 119,000 kids, aged 4 to 17, who were treated at Texas Children's Hospital in Houston more than once between 2011...

Study Finds No Benefit From Supplemental Oxygen During Labor

5 January 2021
Study Finds No Benefit From Supplemental Oxygen During LaborTUESDAY, Jan. 5, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- For decades, women have commonly been given oxygen during childbirth, but a new research review finds little evidence it benefits newborns.The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that women be given supplemental oxygen when fetal heart monitoring shows an abnormal heart rate. That's based on the possibility that oxygen deprivation is causing the problem.Yet there has been little research evidence that the tactic does any good. And the new review, of 16 clinical trials, uncovered no clear benefits for newborns.Overall, infants born to women who received oxygen fared no better than those whose mothers simply breathed "room air." Their breathing, heart rate, reflexes and muscle tone at birth were similar, and they were...

On Waitlist for Liver Transplants, Women Die More Often Than Men

5 January 2021
On Waitlist for Liver Transplants, Women Die More Often Than MenTUESDAY, Jan. 5, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Frailty may explain why women awaiting a liver transplant are more likely than men to become too sick for a transplant or die before transplantation, a new study suggests.Exercise and a healthier diet may help narrow that gender gap, researchers say.For the study, researchers followed more than 1,400 patients with cirrhosis awaiting a liver transplant from nine U.S. transplant centers. About 40% were women. The men, ages 49 to 63, were more likely to have chronic hepatitis C and alcoholic liver disease.The women, ages 50 to 63, were more likely to have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and autoimmune cholestatic liver disease. Both groups had similar levels of disease severity.However, the women were significantly frailer than the men, the...
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