Latest Women's Health News

21Sep
2022

Back to School: Keeping Kids Safe From Dangerous Food Allergies

Back to School: Keeping Kids Safe From Dangerous Food AllergiesWEDNESDAY, Sept. 21, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- The back-to-school season may bring on stress for parents of children who live with food allergies. Parents can help reduce fear and anxiety by following some safety tips from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. School districts may have different policies for how to keep school safe for kids who have allergies. If you're a parent of one of the nearly 3 million kids who have allergies, meet with your child's teacher and school nurse to explain your child's food triggers. If needed, you can give cafeteria workers a picture of your child and request allergy-free lunches.Get a note from your child's doctor that lets your child keep emergency allergy medication at school. It's not just lunch to be concerned about -- you also...

Most Pregnancy-Related Deaths in U.S. Could Have Been...

20 September 2022
Most Pregnancy-Related Deaths in U.S. Could Have Been PreventedTUESDAY, Sept. 20, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- More than four out of five pregnancy-related deaths in the United States could have been prevented, according to a new federal government report. The researchers examined data from Maternal Mortality Review Committees in 36 states on circumstances surrounding pregnancy-related deaths. The data, from 2017 to 2019, included leading causes of death by race and ethnicity.“The report paints a much clearer picture of pregnancy-related deaths in this country,” said Dr. Wanda Barfield, director of the division of reproductive health at the U.S. National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. “The majority of pregnancy-related deaths were preventable, highlighting the need for quality improvement initiatives in states,...

'Life Changing': New Drug Eases Severe Eczema in Young Kids

20 September 2022
`Life Changing`: New Drug Eases Severe Eczema in Young KidsTUESDAY, Sept 20, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Sonia Dhaliwal knows exactly how bad childhood eczema can get.That’s because her young daughter, Ariah Nihal Khan, has struggled with a severe case of the skin condition ever since she was a baby.Ariah's symptoms were relentless and debilitating until the age of 3. They included rashes, skin discolorations all across her face, eyelids, hands and knees, and itching so bad that "she would literally wake up screaming and crying with blood spots from scratching," Dhaliwal said. "She was losing sleep. She wasn't eating well. She was cranky," her mom said. "And it had a big effect on her mood and personality.""Meanwhile, her pediatrician recommended lotions at first, and then prescription medicines," the Illinois resident noted. "A lot of them. I...

Researchers May Have Noninvasive Way to Diagnose...

20 September 2022
Researchers May Have Noninvasive Way to Diagnose EndometriosisTUESDAY, Sept. 20, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Women can suffer for years with the debilitating pain and medical complications of endometriosis without a diagnosis. Now, researchers believe they may be able to diagnose the condition using just menstrual blood, which has distinct characteristics in patients who have endometriosis."Millions of adolescents and women suffer from endometriosis without a proper diagnosis, delaying their care and extending their pain," said study co-author Christine Metz, a professor in the Institute of Molecular Medicine at the Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research in Manhasset, N.Y. She is also co-director of Research OutSmarts Endometriosis (ROSE) study. "This new paper describes the potential for a novel screening tool to identify endometriosis earlier...

Umbilical Cords Could Be Lifesavers for Fragile Newborns

19 September 2022
Umbilical Cords Could Be Lifesavers for Fragile NewbornsMONDAY, Sept. 19, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- When doctors deliver a healthy newborn, it’s common to wait about a minute to clamp and cut the umbilical cord, giving the baby the benefits of extra cord blood as it begins its life outside the womb.The same is not true for babies born limp, with minimal breathing. The go-to plan for those babies, known as "non-vigorous" infants, has been to clamp the cord quickly and work on stabilizing them. Now, a new study suggests there might be a different option for these high-risk newborns, one in which the doctor gives the cord a few gentle squeezes, “milking” it of its benefits for the baby by slowly pushing the blood into the baby’s abdomen. That’s followed by swiftly clamping the cord and then beginning resuscitation efforts.The study,...
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