Latest Women's Health News

26Jan
2023

Childhood Autism Diagnosis Is Getting Better, But Not for Everyone

Childhood Autism Diagnosis Is Getting Better, But Not for EveryoneTHURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Autism cases are surging in the New York-New Jersey metro area, mainly fueled by the diagnosis of autistic children who don’t have intellectual disabilities, a new study reports. The percentage of kids identified with autism spectrum disorder rose from about 1% in 2000 to 3% in 2016 in that region, said lead researcher Josephine Shenouda, program manager and epidemiologist with the Rutgers University Children’s Research Center in New Jersey.That increase occurred mainly due to new diagnoses of autistic children with a borderline, average or above-average IQ, according to findings published Jan. 26 in the journal Pediatrics.“The driver of the increase of autism was really coming from identification of children with autism without...

Mom's Exposure to Dirty Air in Pregnancy Could Harm a...

26 January 2023
Mom`s Exposure to Dirty Air in Pregnancy Could Harm a Toddler`s DevelopmentTHURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- A mother-to-be's exposure to air pollution during pregnancy may have a lasting impact on her baby's brain development, new research indicates.Toddlers scored lower on assessments for thinking, motor and language skills when their mothers had more exposure to pollutants during pregnancy, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder.“Our findings suggest that pollution exposure, particularly during mid-to-late pregnancy, may negatively impact neurodevelopment in early life,” co-author Tanya Alderete, an assistant professor of integrative physiology, said in a university news release.To study this, the researchers followed 161 healthy, Hispanic mother-infant pairs who lived in Southern California and were enrolled in the...

Preeclampsia in Pregnancy a Bad Sign for Women's Future...

26 January 2023
Preeclampsia in Pregnancy a Bad Sign for Women`s Future Heart HealthTHURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- A new study finds troubling information about a link between the pregnancy complication preeclampsia and future heart attack, even in younger women.Danish researchers found a fourfold higher risk of heart attack and stroke within just seven years after delivery. Risks continued to be elevated more than 20 years later, according to findings published Jan. 26 in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.Preeclampsia is a potentially dangerous condition when a pregnant woman has high blood pressure and high levels of protein in urine that indicate kidney damage (proteinuria), or other signs of organ damage.“The high risk of cardiovascular disease after preeclampsia manifests at young ages and early after delivery,” said study author Dr....

Research Gives Clues to Why Cancer in One Breast Could...

24 January 2023
Research Gives Clues to Why Cancer in One Breast Could Develop in the OtherTUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Some women with cancer in one breast may have a greater risk of developing cancer in the other breast, new research suggests.Those who carry a specific genetic change — a germline BRCA1, BRCA2 or CHEK2 mutation — have at least a twofold increased risk of cancer in both breasts, also called contralateral breast cancer, according to researchers at the Mayo Clinic Comprehensive Cancer Center in Rochester, Minn. The study of 15,000 women also found that those with germline ATM mutations did not have a significantly elevated risk of cancer in both breasts.For some carriers of the PALB2 gene, the risk was dependent on other factors. They had a significantly elevated risk of cancer in both breasts if they had estrogen receptor-negative disease,...

Treating Menopausal Symptoms: An Expert Describes Pros, Cons

24 January 2023
Treating Menopausal Symptoms: An Expert Describes Pros, ConsTUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- For women experiencing menopause symptoms with no sign of relief in sight, it doesn’t have to be this way.An expert in women’s health offers some suggestions for helping control symptoms during this time of life when menstrual cycles end."We sometimes hear the question, 'Do I need to treat hot flashes or night sweats?' and the answer for many may be, 'yes.' Because hot flashes and night sweats affect quality of life and productivity at work and at home for women," said Dr. Jewel Kling, chair of the division of women’s health at Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz.Other common symptoms include insomnia and mood changes.One treatment is hormone replacement therapy (HRT). This typically includes estrogen plus progestogen, according to a Mayo...
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