Latest Women's Health News

4Jan
2021

Fewer Food Allergies in Kids If Mom Drinks Milk While Breastfeeding: Study

Fewer Food Allergies in Kids If Mom Drinks Milk While Breastfeeding: StudyMONDAY, Jan. 4, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Mothers who drink cow's milk while breastfeeding may reduce their child's risk of developing food allergies, a new Swedish study suggests."This is a compelling first step in defining a potential relationship between maternal diet and allergy risk," said Dr. Peter Lio, a clinical assistant professor of dermatology and pediatrics at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, in Chicago.Lio, who was not involved in the study, called the work "well-done, thorough and provocative."For the study, researchers asked more than 500 Swedish mothers about their eating habits in their 34th week of pregnancy, one month after giving birth and again four months later. They verified the mothers' reported intake of milk and milk products through...

As Lockdowns Keep Pregnant Women From Exercise,...

4 January 2021
As Lockdowns Keep Pregnant Women From Exercise, Depression Rates Rise: StudyMONDAY, Jan.4, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The COVID-19 pandemic is taking a toll on the emotional health of pregnant women whose exercise routines have been disrupted because of the coronavirus, new research shows.Those women had higher depression scores than their counterparts who were able to exercise as usual, the researchers found. "Our results demonstrate that the COVID-19 pandemic may exacerbate the elevated risk that pregnant women have for prenatal depression," said lead author Theresa Gildner, a postdoctoral fellow in anthropology at Dartmouth College, in Hanover, N.H. "Moderate exercise has been shown to decrease depression risk in pregnant women, so disruptions to exercise routines may lead to worse mental health outcomes," Gildner explained.For the study, the researchers...

High Blood Pressure While Pregnant Linked to Poorer...

4 January 2021
High Blood Pressure While Pregnant Linked to Poorer Memory Years LaterMONDAY, Jan. 4, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- High blood pressure and pre-eclampsia during pregnancy may follow women through the years, causing lower scores on tests of memory and thinking skills, a Dutch study suggests.The study of nearly 600 pregnant women included 481 with normal blood pressure and 115 who developed high blood pressure during their pregnancies.Of those 115 women, 70% had gestational hypertension, which is high blood pressure that starts after 20 weeks of pregnancy in women who previously had normal readings. The other 30% had pre-eclampsia, a pregnancy complication marked by high blood pressure and elevated protein levels in the urine that develop after 20 weeks of pregnancy."Women with high blood pressure that starts in pregnancy, as well as women with pre-eclampsia,...

Even Rich Americans Don't Get World-Class Health Care: Study

31 December 2020
Even Rich Americans Don`t Get World-Class Health Care: StudyTHURSDAY, Dec. 31, 2020 -- Even the most privileged people in the United States with the best access to health care are sicker and more likely to die than average folks in other developed nations, a new study finds.People living in the highest-income counties in the United States are, on average, more likely to die from a heart attack or cancer, during childbirth, or to lose an infant than people in 12 other industrialized countries, according to findings published online Dec. 28 in JAMA Internal Medicine."We're talking about whites, and we're talking about whites living in the richest parts of the country," said lead researcher Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel, chairman of medical ethics and health policy at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, in Philadelphia. "We were...

Laughter As Medicine: Clowns Help Hospitalized Kids Cope

31 December 2020
Laughter As Medicine: Clowns Help Hospitalized Kids CopeTHURSDAY, Dec. 31, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Send in the clowns. They could help hospitalized children cope with pain and anxiety. New research shows that hospital clowns can help improve both physical symptoms and the psychological well-being of children and teens through laughter and play. For the study, researchers from Brazil and Canada reviewed databases to find clinical trials on the subject of hospital clowns published up until February 2020. They found 24 relevant trials involving 1,612 children and adolescents. In those trials, anxiety was the most frequently analyzed symptom, followed by pain, psychological and emotional responses, perceived well-being, stress, cancer-related fatigue and crying. The results suggested that children and adolescents with both short-term and...
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