Latest Women's Health News

19May
2020

Black and White Women Share the Same Genetic Risk for Breast Cancer

TUESDAY, May 19, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Black and white women share genes that increase the risk for breast cancer, a new study finds. These genes include BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2, each of which is associated with a more than sevenfold risk of breast cancer. Women of both races also share four other genes linked with a moderately increased risk, according to researchers. "This means that the multi-gene panels that are currently available to test women diagnosed with breast cancer or women at high risk due to their family history will be useful for African-American women," study co-author Julie Palmer said in a Boston University news release. She is director of the university's Slone Epidemiology Center. For the study, the researchers compared data from more than 5,000 black women...

Don't Delay If Cancer Symptoms Appear – Call Your...

18 May 2020
MONDAY, May 18, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The coronavirus pandemic has many people putting off medical appointments, but if you have possible cancer symptoms, don't delay. A small lump in a breast, blood in your stool or an odd-looking mole, for example, should not be ignored, according to experts at Cedars-Sinai Health System in Los Angeles. "We're seeing a concerning trend that some cancer diagnoses are being delayed because of perceived disruptions of care due to COVID-19," said Dr. Dan Theodorescu, director of Cedars-Sinai Cancer. "I strongly encourage anyone who suspects they might have cancer to get in touch with their physicians, as the use of telemedicine or other available physical-distancing tools will allow them to get medical help immediately," he said in a health...

Newborn May Have Contracted Coronavirus in the Womb: Report

15 May 2020
FRIDAY, May 15, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- A Canadian newborn is a "probable" case of infection with the new coronavirus while still in the womb, doctors report. Other such cases have been suspected and reported in prior studies. But the mother's active case of COVID-19, along with the fact that the baby boy was delivered via C-section, add weight to the notion that maternal-fetal transmission of the SARS-CoV-2 virus can occur, the Toronto doctors concluded. There was good news, however: Although the baby was born preterm (about 36 weeks), he was a healthy 6.5 pounds. And even though testing positive for coronavirus, he did not develop COVID-19. Still, the case "represents a probable case of congenital SARS-CoV-2 infection in a liveborn neonate," said researchers led by pediatrician...

'Good Bacteria' Might Help Fight a Common Gynecologic...

13 May 2020
WEDNESDAY, May 13, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- A dose of healthy bacteria could give women the upper hand in ridding themselves of a common but annoying vaginal infection, a new clinical trial reports. Women treated with Lactin-V -- an experimental vaginal suppository containing live bacteria -- were much more likely to end their recurring bouts of bacterial vaginosis than women treated with a placebo, the researchers said. "What we're doing essentially is knocking down the bad bacteria and then replacing the good bacteria, allowing them to grow and keep at bay the bad bacteria as part of an optimal balance," explained lead researcher Dr. Craig Cohen, a professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at the University of California, San Francisco. Bacterial vaginosis (BV)...

More Evidence Sugary Drinks Harm Women's Hearts

13 May 2020
WEDNESDAY, May 13, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Women who drink a lot of sodas, sweetened juices and other sugary drinks are at greater risk of developing heart disease, a new study finds. Those who drink one or more a day have nearly a 20% higher risk than women who never do. And it's not just soda that's problematic: Fruit drinks with added sugars are also a culprit, researchers say. Though the study does not prove cause and effect, researchers suspect there are several reasons sugar can increase heart disease risk, according to lead author Cheryl Anderson, interim chair of Family and Public Health at the University of California, San Diego. "It raises glucose levels and insulin concentrations in the blood, which may increase appetite and lead to obesity, a major risk factor for...
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