Latest Women's Health News

11May
2022

Frozen Testes Tissue in Mice Still Viable After Two Decades

Frozen Testes Tissue in Mice Still Viable After Two DecadesWEDNESDAY, May 11, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- In a finding that offers hope to childhood cancer survivors who may want to have children after they beat their disease, research in rodents shows that testicular tissue frozen for more than 20 years can still produce viable sperm.However, the tissue is less fertile than samples frozen for only a few months.Childhood cancer survival rates have increased significantly in recent decades, but a serious side effect of treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation is reduced fertility later in life. For boys, a potential method of preserving fertility would be to harvest, freeze and later re-implant testicular tissue, which contains stem cells that produce sperm (SSCs). Previous research has shown that this approach can restore fertility in...

Pregnant American Women Are Facing Higher Exposures to...

10 May 2022
Pregnant American Women Are Facing Higher Exposures to ChemicalsTUESDAY, May 10, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to potentially harmful chemicals is on the rise among pregnant women in the United States, a new study warns."This is the first time we've been able to measure the amounts of chemicals in such a large and diverse group of pregnant women — not just identify chemicals," senior study author Tracey Woodruff, director of the University of California, San Francisco Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment, said in a university news release.For the study, Woodruff's team analyzed 12 years of urine samples from 171 women in California, Georgia, Illinois, New Hampshire, New York and Puerto Rico enrolled in the U.S. National Institutes of Health Environmental Influences on Child Health Outcomes program.About one-third (34%) were...

Why High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy Bodes Ill for...

10 May 2022
Why High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy Bodes Ill for Future Health TUESDAY, May 10, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- High blood pressure complications during pregnancy can be scary, but a new study warns they also significantly raise a woman's risk for heart disease later in life."Women with a history of gestational hypertension or preeclampsia should be informed that they have an increased risk for cardiovascular disease," said study author Jennifer Stuart. She is an associate epidemiologist in the division of women's health at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, in Boston."While the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology recognize these conditions as cardiovascular risk factors, women and their providers have lacked clear direction on what to do in the intervening years between delivery of a hypertensive...

Better School Lunches Blunt U.S. Kids' Weight Gain

9 May 2022
Better School Lunches Blunt U.S. Kids` Weight GainMONDAY, May 9, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- America's kids have a weight problem, but regulations that boosted the nutritional standards for school meals may have helped slowed down weight gain among low-income students, a new study finds.For decades, the National School Lunch Program has provided free or low-cost meals to U.S. schoolchildren. As of 2016, more than 30 million students nationwide were participating, according to government figures.In 2010, a federal law was passed to strengthen the nutritional requirements of those school meals, aiming to increase children's intake of fruits, vegetables, fiber-rich grains and unsweetened beverages.The move came in response to a worrisome trend: U.S. children who participated in the meal program were, on average, gaining more weight than...

There's a Secret to Getting Kids to Eat Vegetables

9 May 2022
There`s a Secret to Getting Kids to Eat VegetablesMONDAY, May 9, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Do you have a child who refuses to eat anything green? Rewarding them for trying new vegetables may make them more willing to eat them, a new study claims."It's important to start eating vegetables from a young age," said lead researcher Britt van Belkom, from the Youth, Food and Health program at Maastricht University's Institute for Food, Health and Safety by Design in the Netherlands.“We know from previous research that young children typically have to try a new vegetable eight to 10 times before they like it," she noted. “And so we looked at whether repeatedly asking children to try some vegetables would make them more willing to eat their greens. We were also interested in whether providing a fun reward would make a difference.”The...
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