Latest Women's Health News

4Oct
2023

Shorter Course of Radiation May Be Safe for Women Undergoing Breast Reconstruction

Shorter Course of Radiation May Be Safe for Women Undergoing Breast ReconstructionWEDNESDAY, Oct. 4, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer patients who undergo a mastectomy can probably benefit from a shorter course of more intense radiation therapy, a new study indicates.Hypofractionated radiation therapy — which provides a higher dose each session over three weeks — provides the same protection against breast cancer recurrence and post-surgical complications as a standard course of lower-dose radiation over five weeks, researchers from Dana-Farber Brigham Cancer Center in Boston found.“Our trial results suggest that hypofractionation can safely be used in this setting without compromising efficacy or increasing side effects,” said senior study author Dr. Rinaa Punglia, a radiation oncologist at Dana-Farber. “Reducing the requirement to three weeks of...

Women Give High Marks to Breast Reconstruction Using...

3 October 2023
Women Give High Marks to Breast Reconstruction Using Patient`s Own TissueTUESDAY, Oct. 3, 2023 (HealthDay News) – Women who have breast reconstruction using their own tissue instead of implants ma be more satisfied with the results, new research shows."The findings were unexpected, since autologous breast reconstruction is a more complex procedure, with a higher rate of severe complications," said lead author Nadia Sadok, of University Medical Center Groningen in the Netherlands.The study included 63 women who chose what’s called autologous reconstruction. This is done with a flap of the patient's own skin and underlying tissues. It also included 75 women who chose breast implants.Researchers compared quality of life in women with breast cancer who chose these different options for breast reconstruction after a mastectomy.The patients rated their...

PFAS Chemicals Tied to Later Puberty in Girls

3 October 2023
PFAS Chemicals Tied to Later Puberty in GirlsTUESDAY, Oct. 3, 2023 (HealthDay News) – Exposure to ubiquitous chemicals known as PFAS, or per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, may delay puberty in girls, new research indicates.The study is the first to consider the role hormones play in the delay, according to researchers from the University of Cincinnati.Delayed puberty can lead to negative long-term health outcomes for girls, such as a higher incidence of breast cancer, kidney disease and thyroid disease, said corresponding author Susan Pinney, a professor of environmental and public health sciences at the university's College of Medicine.“Puberty is a window of susceptibility,” Pinney said in a university news release. “Environmental exposures during puberty, not just to PFAS, but anything, have more of a potential for a...

Breastfeeding in Infancy Tied to Healthier Weight Later...

2 October 2023
Breastfeeding in Infancy Tied to Healthier Weight Later for KidsMONDAY, Oct. 2, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- What a baby eats, or how the baby eats, may have an impact on future weight and health, research has shown.A new study backs that up. It found that 9-year-olds who had been breast-fed for six months or more had a lower percentage of body fat than their peers who were never breast-fed or received breast milk.The researchers also found that kids who were not given soda before 18 months of age also had less fat at age 9.Past studies have zeroed in on links between infant feeding and obesity based on body mass index (BMI) — an estimate of body fat based on height and weight. This one relied on what researchers considered a more precise measure: percent fat mass. That's the proportion of total weight owing to body fat.“Infancy is a vulnerable...

Mammograms: An Expert Overview on Why They're So Important

1 October 2023
Mammograms: An Expert Overview on Why They`re So ImportantSUNDAY, Oct. 1, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Mammograms have long offered early detection of breast cancer, which is why getting them regularly is crucial to women’s health, one expert says. “There are several risk factors associated with breast cancer. As with many other diseases, risk of developing breast cancer increases as you get older,” said Dr. Mridula George, associate program director of breast medical oncology at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey.Breast cancer is the second-most common cancer for women after skin cancer, according to the American Cancer Society.A woman whose mother or sister developed breast or ovarian cancer may be at high risk for the disease. So, too, might someone who has multiple family members who developed breast, ovarian or prostate cancer.In...
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