Latest Women's Health News

25Aug
2021

For Better Breastfeeding, 'Lactation Consultants' Can Help

For Better Breastfeeding, `Lactation Consultants` Can HelpWEDNESDAY, Aug. 25, 2021 (HealthDay News) – Breastfeeding provides a baby with many positive benefits, but it doesn't always happen easily.When a new mom feels overwhelmed by the challenge, a lactation consultant can help, according to two breastfeeding experts from Penn State Health."We're here to make sure new moms can get to where they want to be with their infant — breastfeeding with ease and confidence," said Nancy McDaniel, a self-described cheerleader for breastfeeding moms. She's a registered nurse and board-certified lactation consultant at Penn State Health Children's Hospital in Hershey, Pa.She and other lactation consultants are trained to help new mothers establish and sustain breastfeeding — even if they have medical conditions or are having troubleNurse educator...

Exercise Could Help Fight 'Chemo Brain' in Breast Cancer...

25 August 2021
Exercise Could Help Fight `Chemo Brain` in Breast Cancer PatientsWEDNESDAY, Aug. 25, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- For breast cancer patients battling "chemo brain," regular exercise may be a powerful prescription, a new study suggests.The term "chemo brain" refers to thinking and memory problems often experienced by patients who undergo chemotherapy.It's "a growing clinical concern," said study first author Elizabeth Salerno, an assistant professor of surgery at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. "Some patients with cancer experience memory lapses, difficulty concentrating or trouble finding the right word to finish a sentence."In the study, Salerno's team analyzed data from 580 U.S. breast cancer patients and a control group of 363 without cancer.Before chemo, 33% of the cancer patients met government guidelines calling for at least...

Teachers' Unions, Doctors Agree: Vaccines, Masks Crucial...

23 August 2021
Teachers` Unions, Doctors Agree: Vaccines, Masks Crucial for Return-to-SchoolMONDAY, Aug. 23, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Schools are reopening as the Delta variant surges across America, a scary prospect for educators and parents alike.But experts representing teachers and doctors say reopening must happen for the sake of students, and a combo of vaccination and safety measures will help keep kids and staff safe.Kids have suffered during the pandemic, and they need in-person schooling this year, Dr. Angela Myers, division director of infectious diseases with Children's Mercy Kansas City, said in a HealthDay Now interview."What we know from the data is that when kids were in school full-time, they learned better and their mental health was better," Myers said. "We know what the right thing to do is, and we know how to keep kids safe and keep kids healthy and keep...

Parents' Poll Finds Strong Support for Vaccination of...

23 August 2021
Parents` Poll Finds Strong Support for Vaccination of Students, TeachersMONDAY, Aug. 23, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- As the school year starts across much of the United States amid a surge in coronavirus cases fueled by the Delta variant, a new survey shows most parents support vaccines for students and staff alike.Sixty-two percent of nearly 1,700 parents with at least one child aged 7 to 18 said they would feel safer if schools had higher vaccination rates, according to the University of Michigan Health C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health. Three in five parents of middle school and high school students also said their child would feel safer if most students and teachers were vaccinated, and most parents said they want to know how many aren't vaccinated.Still, only one in five parents in the nationwide poll said vaccination...

Age Can Impair a Man's Odds for Fatherhood: Study

23 August 2021
Age Can Impair a Man`s Odds for Fatherhood: StudyMONDAY, Aug. 23, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- It's no surprise to hear that women's fertility wanes as their biological clock ticks away.But do men have a biological clock, too?New research shows it's not exactly the same, but their likelihood of fathering a child does appear to decline, even with assisted reproductive technology, once they're past age 50. Research completed among potential fathers both above and under age 50 in the United Kingdom found that even with in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), the chance of achieving a live birth significantly declined once a man was over 50. However, that paternal age did not independently affect risk of miscarriage after assisted reproductive technology.It "wasn't too surprising in that it demonstrated that...
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