Latest Women's Health News

28May
2021

Another Study Finds Routine Vaccines Safe for Kids, Adults

Another Study Finds Routine Vaccines Safe for Kids, Adults FRIDAY, May 28, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- If more proof of the safety of vaccines is needed, a new study delivers fresh evidence that they carry few harms for children, adults and pregnant women."This in-depth analysis found no evidence of increased risk of serious adverse events following vaccines, apart from a few — previously known — associations," said Susanne Hempel, director of the Southern California Evidence Review Center at the University of Southern California.The researchers analyzed 338 studies of vaccines for diseases such as influenza, measles, mumps, shingles, whooping cough, tetanus and human papillomavirus (HPV). COVID-19 vaccines weren't among the vaccines reviewed in the study.The investigators found strong evidence that the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine...

Skin-to-Skin Contact Could Boost Survival of Very...

28 May 2021
Skin-to-Skin Contact Could Boost Survival of Very Premature BabiesFRIDAY, May 28, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- In a finding that demonstrates the power of a mother's touch, new research shows that immediate and continuous skin-to-skin contact with mom reduces the risk of death for low-weight newborns in poorer nations."The idea of giving skin-to-skin contact immediately after delivery to very small, unstable babies has encountered quite strong resistance, but about 75% of deaths occur before the infant has been judged sufficiently stable," noted study author Dr. Nils Bergman, of Sweden's Karolinska Institute. Bergman, a researcher in the institute's Department of Women's and Children's Health, spoke in an institute news release.So, is separating a mom from her tiny newborn necessarily helping the infant?To find out, the Swedish team looked at more than...

After Testing Fell During Pandemic, Is a Surge in STDs...

27 May 2021
After Testing Fell During Pandemic, Is a Surge in STDs Ahead?THURSDAY, May 27, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- There was a sharp drop in testing for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic, and that could translate into a future rise in cases, researchers say."The quickest way for people to spread STIs is to not know that they have one," said study author Casey Pinto, an assistant professor of public health sciences at Penn State College of Medicine."The inability to detect asymptomatic cases could have negative repercussions for years to come," Pinto warned in a Penn State news release.For the study, the investigators reviewed data on more than 18 million STI test results from patients (aged 14 to 49) from January 2019 through June 2020, and found screening declines of 63% for men and 59% for women in...

Global Warming Could Bring More Stillbirths, Study Warns

27 May 2021
Global Warming Could Bring More Stillbirths, Study Warns THURSDAY, May 27, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Rising temperatures caused by climate change could trigger a worldwide increase in stillbirths, researchers warn. The team at the University of Queensland in Australia analyzed 12 studies on the subject. They found that exposure to extremely high temperatures throughout pregnancy appeared to increase risk of stillbirth, particularly late in pregnancy. "Overall, risk of stillbirth appears to increase when the ambient temperature is below 15 degrees Celsius [59 degrees Fahrenheit] and above 23.4 degrees Celsius [74 degrees F], with the highest risk being above 29.4 degrees Celsius [85 degrees F]," said lead researcher Jessica Sexton. She is a PhD candidate in Queensland's School of Earth and Environmental Science and the Mater Research...

Birth Order, Family Size May Affect Heart Health

26 May 2021
Birth Order, Family Size May Affect Heart HealthWEDNESDAY, May 26, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- It's known that genetics and lifestyle can affect your heart health. Now, researchers say, your birth order and family size may also have an impact.A new Swedish study found that first-born children had a lower risk of heart attacks and strokes than their younger brothers and sisters. But having many siblings was associated with an increased risk of such cardiovascular events."More research is needed to understand the links between sibling number and rank with health outcomes," said the researchers, led by Peter Nilsson, from Lund University in Malmö. "Future research should be directed to find biological or social mechanisms linking the status of being first-born to lower risk of cardiovascular disease." For the study, the authors accessed...
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