Latest Women's Health News

11Feb
2021

COVID Vaccine Reaction Can Mimic Breast Cancer Symptoms, But Doctors Say 'Don't Panic'

COVID Vaccine Reaction Can Mimic Breast Cancer Symptoms, But Doctors Say `Don`t Panic`THURSDAY, Feb. 11, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- One side effect of COVID-19 vaccination is creating undue fear among women, causing them to worry that they might have breast cancer.Both the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines can cause lymph nodes to swell, particularly those in the armpit on the side where the shot was received, experts say.Some women are feeling these armpit lymph nodes and mistaking them for breast lumps, according to a recent report.Further, these swollen lymph nodes can show up in a mammogram even if women can't feel them. That prompted the Society of Breast Imaging to recommend that women postpone any mammography scheduled within four weeks after their final COVID-19 shot.Post-vaccine lymph node swelling is common and harmless, but doctors are concerned it could cause undue...

Antibiotics in Pregnancy Tied to Higher Odds for Asthma...

11 February 2021
Antibiotics in Pregnancy Tied to Higher Odds for Asthma in KidsTHURSDAY, Feb. 11, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Children whose mothers used antibiotics in pregnancy may have a slightly heightened risk of asthma, a new study suggests.Experts were quick to point out the finding does not prove cause and effect, and the reasons for the antibiotic use -- rather than the drug -- might explain the link, said lead researcher Cecilie Skaarup Uldbjerg, of Aarhus University in Denmark."Previous studies have found associations between maternal infections in pregnancy and childhood asthma," Uldbjerg said. Dr. Anthony Scialli, an expert in the reproductive effects of medications, went further.He said it's likely that something else explains the small increase in asthma risk.Maternal infections are one possibility, agreed Scialli, a clinical professor of obstetrics...

AHA News: Why Black Women Are Less Likely to Survive...

11 February 2021
AHA News: Why Black Women Are Less Likely to Survive Pregnancy, and What`s Being Done About ItTHURSDAY, Feb. 11, 2021 (American Heart Association News) -- Being Black and pregnant in the U.S. was already a risky combination, and health experts now worry the pandemic is making things worse.Before the pandemic, Black women were three times more likely than Hispanic women and 2.5 times more likely than white women to die from causes linked to pregnancy, according to the latest Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data from 2018. Those statistics suggest that for every 100,000 live births, 37 Black women died while pregnant or within six weeks of pregnancy compared to 12 Hispanic women and 15 white women.Although data regarding the pandemic's impact on maternal mortality won't be available for some time, medical experts and health advocates are collecting anecdotes that...

Prescription Opioids, Antibiotics in Pregnancy Won't...

11 February 2021
Prescription Opioids, Antibiotics in Pregnancy Won`t Raise Birth Defect Risk: StudiesTHURSDAY, Feb. 11, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Taking prescription opioid painkillers or a common class of antibiotics during pregnancy doesn't increase the risk of major birth defects, according to two new studies.Both are often prescribed to pregnant women. Some studies have linked them with certain birth defects, but findings have been inconsistent.These new studies -- published Feb. 10 in the BMJ -- sought to clarify the issue.In the first study, researchers led by Dr. Brian Bateman, an associate professor of medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, analyzed 2000-2015 data for more than 82,000 U.S. women who received two or more opioid prescriptions during the first trimester of pregnancy.After accounting for other potential risk factors, there was no clinically meaningful...

Fetal Surgery Is Changing Lives for Kids With Spina Bifida

10 February 2021
Fetal Surgery Is Changing Lives for Kids With Spina BifidaWEDNESDAY, Feb. 10, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Spina bifida is a diagnosis no parents-to-be want to hear as they await their child's birth, and the idea of performing surgery on a baby while it is still in the womb can be terrifying. But new research shows that performing the delicate procedure before the baby is born, and not after, is worth it.The findings showed that children with myelomeningocele (the most severe form of spina bifida) who had surgery while in utero were more likely to later be able to walk independently and go up and down stairs than children who had the surgery after they were born. Their leg muscles were stronger and they could walk faster. They also were likely to be able to do self-care tasks for themselves, including brushing their teeth, holding a fork and...
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