Latest Women's Health News

29Sep
2023

FDA Will Begin to Regulate Thousands of Lab Tests

FDA Will Begin to Regulate Thousands of Lab TestsFRIDAY, Sept. 29, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Faced with growing reports of inaccurate clinical lab tests, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday announced that it will for the first time regulate these vital diagnostic tools.Many Americans might have assumed that the FDA already had oversight of all medical tests; it does not. However, FDA Commissioner Dr. Robert Califf said the time is now to monitor the quality of high-tech tests for cancer, heart disease and a myriad other illnesses. "A growing number of clinical diagnostic tests are being offered as laboratory developed tests without assurance that they work. The stakes are getting higher as these tests are increasingly being used to drive treatment decisions," Califf explained in an FDA news release. "According to the...

Getting COVID Shot During Pregnancy Helps Protect...

29 September 2023
Getting COVID Shot During Pregnancy Helps Protect Newborns, CDC Study FindsFRIDAY, Sept. 29, 2023 (HealthDay News) – When pregnant women get a COVID vaccine, it helps protect their newborns from the virus, a new government study shows."These findings indicate that maternal vaccination during pregnancy could help prevent COVID-19–related hospitalization in infants too young to be vaccinated," researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention wrote.Antibodies after COVID vaccination crossed the placenta and were found in the cord blood, according to the study.Babies can’t receive COVID vaccines until they’re 6 months old. In infants younger than 3 months old, a vulnerable stage of life, maternal vaccination was 54% effective against COVID hospitalization, according to the report.In infants 3 to 5 months old, the vaccine was still 35%...

Most Older Americans Object to Cancer Screening Cutoffs...

29 September 2023
Most Older Americans Object to Cancer Screening Cutoffs Based on Life Expectancy: PollFRIDAY, Sept. 29, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- While guidelines for cancer screening have begun factoring in life expectancy, a new poll shows a majority of older adults disagree with age cutoffs based on how long a person is expected to live.The University of Michigan National Poll on Healthy Aging queried more than 2,500 adults aged 50 to 80 by phone and online in January 2023.The poll found that 62% of people in this age group thought that national guidelines for stopping cancer screenings in individual patients should not be based on how long that person might have left to live.“Personalizing cancer screening decisions to each patient’s health situation, rather than using one-size-fits-all age cutoffs, could benefit both very healthy and less healthy patients in different ways,”...

Childbirth Can Leave New Parents in Serious Medical Debt

29 September 2023
Childbirth Can Leave New Parents in Serious Medical DebtFRIDAY, Sept. 29, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- New parents bringing home their bundle of joy often carry something else with them as they leave the hospital: medical debt.That's according to new research from Michigan Medicine that found postpartum women are more likely to have medical debt than those who are pregnant.The researchers studied this by evaluating collections among a statewide, commercially insured cohort of more than 14,000 pregnant women and more than 12,000 postpartum women.“Our findings suggest that current out-of-pocket costs before and after childbirth are objectively more than many commercially insured families can afford, leading to medical debt,” said lead author Dr. Michelle Moniz, an obstetrician/gynecologist at University of Michigan Health's Von Voigtlander...

Coffee Won't Raise Preemie Birth Risk, But Smoking Certainly Will: Study

28 September 2023
Coffee Won`t Raise Preemie Birth Risk, But Smoking Certainly Will: StudyTHURSDAY, Sept. 28, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking during pregnancy is a significant risk factor for premature births, but drinking coffee is not, new research suggests.Women who smoked during pregnancy were 2.6 times more likely to give birth prematurely compared to nonsmokers, a risk that was double that of previous estimates, the University of Cambridge scientists found.“We’ve known for a long time that smoking during pregnancy is not good for the baby, but our study shows that it’s potentially much worse than previously thought. It puts the baby at risk of potentially serious complications from growing too slowly in the womb or from being born too soon,” said Gordon Smith, head of the department of obstetrics and gynecology at Cambridge, in the United Kingdom.The study...
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