Latest Women's Health News

11Feb
2021

Prescription Opioids, Antibiotics in Pregnancy Won't Raise Birth Defect Risk: Studies

Prescription Opioids, Antibiotics in Pregnancy Won`t Raise Birth Defect Risk: StudiesTHURSDAY, Feb. 11, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Taking prescription opioid painkillers or a common class of antibiotics during pregnancy doesn't increase the risk of major birth defects, according to two new studies.Both are often prescribed to pregnant women. Some studies have linked them with certain birth defects, but findings have been inconsistent.These new studies -- published Feb. 10 in the BMJ -- sought to clarify the issue.In the first study, researchers led by Dr. Brian Bateman, an associate professor of medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, analyzed 2000-2015 data for more than 82,000 U.S. women who received two or more opioid prescriptions during the first trimester of pregnancy.After accounting for other potential risk factors, there was no clinically meaningful...

Fetal Surgery Is Changing Lives for Kids With Spina Bifida

10 February 2021
Fetal Surgery Is Changing Lives for Kids With Spina BifidaWEDNESDAY, Feb. 10, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Spina bifida is a diagnosis no parents-to-be want to hear as they await their child's birth, and the idea of performing surgery on a baby while it is still in the womb can be terrifying. But new research shows that performing the delicate procedure before the baby is born, and not after, is worth it.The findings showed that children with myelomeningocele (the most severe form of spina bifida) who had surgery while in utero were more likely to later be able to walk independently and go up and down stairs than children who had the surgery after they were born. Their leg muscles were stronger and they could walk faster. They also were likely to be able to do self-care tasks for themselves, including brushing their teeth, holding a fork and...

Child Suicides Are Rising During Lockdown; Watch for the...

10 February 2021
Child Suicides Are Rising During Lockdown; Watch for the Warning SignsWEDNESDAY, Feb. 10, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Among the many dangers the coronavirus pandemic has brought, parents really need to be on the lookout for one in particular: an increased risk of suicide among vulnerable teens. "We've seen an upsurge in really bad suicide attempts," and the pandemic is likely behind that increase, said Dr. Taranjeet Jolly, an adult and pediatric psychiatrist at Penn State Health's Milton S. Hershey Medical Center. Social isolation during the pandemic can push youngsters with underlying mental health issues "over the edge," Jolly said in a Penn State Health news release. Other factors include family dysfunction and long amounts of forced time with others. Even children in so-called healthy families can feel overwhelmed. Anxiety about pandemic...

After Long Decline, Breast Cancers in Young U.S. Women...

9 February 2021
After Long Decline, Breast Cancers in Young U.S. Women Are On the RiseTUESDAY, Feb. 9, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer death rates are inching up in American women under age 40 again, after more than two decades of decline, researchers say.The study authors said they hoped their new report would lead to a deeper look at reasons for the change. "Our hope is that these findings focus more attention and research on breast cancer in younger women and what is behind this rapid increase in late-stage cancers," said lead author R. Edward Hendrick. He's a clinical professor of radiology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, in Aurora.Hendrick's team used data from the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics to examine breast cancer death rates in 10-year age subgroups.Between 2010 and 2017, breast cancer death rates for 40- to 79-year-old...

More Parents Balking at Giving Kids Cancer-Fighting HPV Vaccine

9 February 2021
More Parents Balking at Giving Kids Cancer-Fighting HPV VaccineTUESDAY, Feb. 9, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Although more teens are getting the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, parents' hesitancy is growing, a new study finds.From 2012 to 2018, more doctors recommended their patients get vaccinated with the HPV vaccine -- from 27% to 49%. But at the same time, the number of parents who were reluctant to have their kids vaccinated increased from 50% to 64%, researchers found."Overall, more U.S. teens are getting the HPV vaccine, and the nation is making progress towards reaching the HPV vaccination goals; however, if parental reluctance continues to grow, the current rate of our progress might plateau or possibly decline," said lead study author Kalyani Sonawane. She's an assistant professor in the department of management, policy and community...
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