Latest Women's Health News

15Nov
2022

Chemicals in Household Plastics May Raise Risk for Fibroids

Chemicals in Household Plastics May Raise Risk for FibroidsTUESDAY, Nov. 15, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Uterine fibroids can cause uncontrolled bleeding and infertility in women, and now a new study finds an unexpected culprit: Toxic chemicals called phthalates that are present in everything from fast-food packaging to plastic water bottles.“We detected the phthalate DEHP and its breakdown products in much higher quantities in the urine of women who also happen to have symptomatic uterine fibroid tumors. Then we asked the question whether this association was causal. And the answer was yes,” said corresponding study author Dr. Serdar Bulun. He is chair of the department of obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, in Chicago. Up to 80% of women will develop one or more fibroids in their lives, some...

More U.S. Kids Are Heading to ERs After Drinking Cough...

15 November 2022
More U.S. Kids Are Heading to ERs After Drinking Cough SuppressantTUESDAY, Nov. 15, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing numbers of young children are showing up in emergency rooms after accidentally ingesting the cough suppressant benzonatate, U.S. health officials reported Tuesday.Benzonatate is a non-narcotic cough suppressant first approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 1958 for children ages 10 and up. It works by reducing the cough reflex in the lungs and airways."Benzonatate is an appealing cough and cold medication due to its non-narcotic properties," said Dr. Elise Perlman, an emergency department physician at Cohen Children's Medical Center in Queens, N.Y."For this reason, there has been a notable increase in benzonatate prescriptions; however, there has also been a concomitant rise in toxicity and adverse effects reported,"...

Progress Against Stillbirths Has Stalled in U.S.

15 November 2022
Progress Against Stillbirths Has Stalled in U.S.TUESDAY, Nov. 15, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. stillbirth rates still need to be tackled at the local, state and national levels because efforts to reduce the risk have stalled, new research claims.Racial disparities remain as well, with Black women more likely to experience stillbirth (the loss of a baby before or during delivery) than white women. "Over the last 40 years, we have reduced certain risk factors for stillbirth, such as smoking and alcohol use before and during pregnancy, but these gains have been countered by substantial increases in other risk factors, like obesity and structural racism," said study lead author Cande Ananth, chief of epidemiology and biostatistics in the Department of Obstetrics, gynecology and Reproductive Sciences at the Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson...

Even in Kindergarten, White Kids More Likely to Join...

15 November 2022
Even in Kindergarten, White Kids More Likely to Join Extracurricular ActivitiesTUESDAY, Nov. 15, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Extracurricular activities may have many benefits for young children, but researchers have discovered racial gaps in who takes part.Among a group of 401 kindergarten students in Ohio, white children were 2.6 times more likely to participate in the most common extracurricular sports than children of other races and ethnicities. The study found similar results for other after-school activities in this age group."If racial-ethnic minority students and those from disadvantaged backgrounds don't have access to extracurricular activities at a young age, they may miss opportunities that could help them succeed in school," researcher Elise Allen said in an Ohio State University news release. She's a graduate student in educational studies at the...

Illinois Study Shows Big Jump in Suicide-Linked ER Visits by Teens

14 November 2022
Illinois Study Shows Big Jump in Suicide-Linked ER Visits by TeensMONDAY, Nov. 14, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Illinois has seen a recent surge in the number of kids arriving in the emergency room for suicidal thoughts -- both during and shortly before the pandemic, according to a new study.Among kids ages 5 to 19, ER visits for suicidal thoughts rose by 59% across the state between 2016 and 2021, researchers found. That included a sharp spike in the fall of 2019, followed by another in the fall of 2020.Experts said that while the findings come from one state, they reflect what's been going on nationally. They also highlight a sobering fact: U.S. children and teenagers have been showing a deterioration in their mental health for years."It's absolutely not the case that this started with the pandemic," said senior researcher Joseph Feinglass, of...
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