Latest Women's Health News

24Mar
2021

Drug Used to Prevent Miscarriages May Be Upping Cancer Rates Decades Later

Drug Used to Prevent Miscarriages May Be Upping Cancer Rates Decades LaterWEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Kids born to moms who took a drug widely used to prevent miscarriages in the 1950s and 1960s may be twice as likely to develop cancer in adulthood.The drug in question, hydroxyprogesterone caproate, also known as OHPC or 17-OHPC, is a man-made version of the hormone progesterone. It is no longer used to reduce the chances of miscarriage, but it's still prescribed to prevent preterm birth under the trade name Makena. Progesterone may help a uterus grow during pregnancy and keep it from contracting and resulting in preterm labor.In October 2020, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research called for this drug's removal from the market because it didn't seem to work all that well, but no official action has...

Postpartum Bleeding Doesn't Have to Mean Hysterectomy,...

24 March 2021
Postpartum Bleeding Doesn`t Have to Mean Hysterectomy, Experts SayWEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Heavy bleeding following birth can threaten the life of the mother, and doctors at times turn to a hysterectomy to end the bleeding. But a new study suggests a less invasive, underused procedure might be a better, less drastic option.Investigators determined that when postpartum bleeding occurs, hysterectomies -- the removal of the uterus -- are 60% more common than uterine artery embolization (UAE) procedures, despite the fact that "UAE is safer and has an easier recovery than hysterectomy," said study author Dr. Janice Newsome, an associate professor in the department of radiology and imaging at Emory University's School of Medicine in Atlanta.Speaking at the Society of Interventional Radiology's virtual annual meeting recently, Newsome...

Why 'Night Owl' Women Might Be at Higher Risk During...

24 March 2021
Why `Night Owl` Women Might Be at Higher Risk During PregnancyWEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Women who develop diabetes during pregnancy have a higher risk of complications for themselves and their babies if they're night owls instead of early birds, a new study finds. Gestational diabetes increases the mother's risk of premature delivery and preeclampsia (pregnancy-induced high blood pressure). It also raises the baby's risk of growing too large in the womb or having breathing problems after birth. The new study included 305 women with gestational diabetes during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Nearly half said they were morning people, 21 were night people and 133 had no strong preference either way. Compared to the other women in the study, night owls had a three times higher risk of preeclampsia, and a four times...

U.S. Cancer Screening Rates Back to Normal After...

24 March 2021
U.S. Cancer Screening Rates Back to Normal After Pandemic DipWEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- After a sharp drop early in the COVID-19 pandemic, rates of routine breast and colon cancer screening soon returned to near-normal levels, a new study finds."These are the first findings to show that, despite real fears about the consequences of drop-off in cancer screens, health facilities figured out how to pick this back up after the initial pandemic restrictions," said lead study author Ryan McBain. He's a policy researcher at RAND Corporation, a nonprofit research organization.For the study, researchers analyzed insurance claims from 6.8 million U.S. adults (aged 45 to 64) filed between mid-January and July 31 of last year.After March 13, 2020, when a national pandemic emergency was declared, the median weekly rate of routine screening...

Common Type 2 Diabetes Meds Won't Raise Breast Cancer Risk: Study

22 March 2021
Common Type 2 Diabetes Meds Won`t Raise Breast Cancer Risk: StudyMONDAY, March 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Widely used diabetes and obesity drugs don't increase the risk of breast cancer, a new study indicates.The drugs — called glucagon like peptide-1 receptor agonists or GLP-1 RAs for short — are effective in treating type 2 diabetes and obesity and in reducing heart disease. But some previous studies have suggested a possible link between them and breast cancer.GLP-1RAs include albiglutide (Tanzeum); dulaglutide (Trulicity); exenatide (Byetta); extended-release exenatide (Bydureon); liraglutide (Victoza, Saxenda); lixisenatide (Adlyxin); and semaglutide (Ozempic, Rybelsus).To evaluate a possible link between the drugs and breast cancer, researchers reviewed 52 randomized controlled trials that compared GLP-1 RAs with other diabetes or...
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