Latest Women's Health News

9Dec
2020

Heart Disease Is World's No. 1 Killer

Heart Disease Is World`s No. 1 KillerWEDNESDAY, Dec. 10, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide -- accounting for one-third of deaths in 2019 -- and the death toll continues to rise, a new paper says.China had the highest number of heart disease deaths last year, followed by India, Russia, the United States and Indonesia. Heart disease death rates were lowest in France, Peru and Japan, where rates were six times lower than in 1990.Countries need to create cost-effective public health programs to reduce heart disease risk through behavior changes, according to the report's authors, who examined 30 years of data.Heart disease cases nearly doubled over the period — from 271 million in 1990 to 523 million in 2019, and the number of heart disease deaths rose from 12.1 million to 18.6...

Side Effects Often Missed During Breast Cancer Radiation...

9 December 2020
Side Effects Often Missed During Breast Cancer Radiation TherapyWEDNESDAY, Dec. 9, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Side effects of radiation therapy in breast cancer patients are often missed by doctors, U.S. researchers report."Recognizing side effects is necessary for physicians to provide supportive care to help patients manage their symptoms," said study author Dr. Reshma Jagsi, deputy chair of the department of radiation oncology at the University of Michigan."Physicians sometimes miscalculate the severity of patients' symptoms, which can lead to reduced quality of life," she noted. "In our study, we found that physicians are more likely to miscalculate symptom severity when patients have certain characteristics, including patients who are younger and patients who are Black."It is possible that there is a misconception among medical professionals...

Some Older Breast Cancer Patients Can Safely Cut Down on...

9 December 2020
Some Older Breast Cancer Patients Can Safely Cut Down on ChemoWEDNESDAY, Dec. 9, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- More women with early-stage breast cancer may be able to safely skip chemotherapy after having surgery, according to initial results from a major clinical trial.The trial, conducted in nine countries, found that adding chemotherapy to hormone-blocking drugs brought no added benefit to a particular group of patients. Those were postmenopausal women with hormone-sensitive breast cancer that had spread to only one to three lymph nodes, and who had a low risk of recurrence.In contrast, researchers found, chemo did help younger, premenopausal women -- reducing their risk of a breast cancer recurrence over five years.Experts predicted the results will change medical practice, freeing thousands of women each year from the toxic side effects of...

Many Breast Cancer Survivors Have Healthy Babies: Study

9 December 2020
Many Breast Cancer Survivors Have Healthy Babies: StudyWEDNESDAY, Dec. 9, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- When a young woman is diagnosed with breast cancer, many questions go through her mind. What treatments does she need? Will she survive? And will she still be able to have a baby?In a review of recent research, an international team of investigators say the answer to that critical third question is yes. Though breast cancer survivors are less likely to become pregnant than the average woman, those who do often have healthy babies and good long-term health."From the patient perspective, we know very well that pregnancy-related issues are really a priority of concern for these women," said Dr. Matteo Lambertini, the study's author.Lambertini is an adjunct professor in medical oncology at the University of Genova — IRCCS Policlinico San...

COVID Fuels Depression Among Pregnant Women, New Moms

9 December 2020
COVID Fuels Depression Among Pregnant Women, New MomsWEDNESDAY, Dec. 9, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- COVID-19 may be behind a concerning rise in the number of women suffering anxiety and depression before and soon after childbirth, a new study says. Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston surveyed more than 1,100 pregnant and postpartum women between May 21 and Aug. 17. They found that 36%, or more than 1 in 3, had significant levels of depression. Prior to the pandemic, rates of perinatal depression were about 15% to 20%.More than 1 in 5 women reported significant levels of generalized anxiety. About 1 in 10 had post-traumatic stress disorder above the clinical threshold."We know the perinatal period is already a time in which women are particularly vulnerable to mental health concerns," said study author Cindy Liu, of the...
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