Latest Women's Health News

25Sep
2023

Tear Gas Might Harm a Woman's Reproductive Health

Tear Gas Might Harm a Woman`s Reproductive HealthMONDAY, Sept. 25, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers in Minnesota have uncovered a new link between tear gas exposures and negative effects on reproductive health.The study was prompted by anecdotal reports of irregular menstrual cycles among protestors who were exposed to tear gas during the nationwide protests that followed the May 2020 murder of George Floyd.“This study adds to previous research documenting the many ways that structural racism through police violence can impact reproductive and perinatal health,” said lead author Asha Hassan, a researcher at the University of Minnesota's Center for Antiracism Research for Health Equity, in Minneapolis.“Law enforcement agencies see chemical agents as ‘less lethal’ weapons, but the fact is that we do not know very much...

Unsafe Neighborhoods Have Higher Levels of Child Abuse

25 September 2023
Unsafe Neighborhoods Have Higher Levels of Child AbuseMONDAY, Sept. 25, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Having safer neighborhoods, where families feel less stress, can help prevent child abuse, according to new research that supports this long-suspected theory.When parents feel higher levels of stress or hopelessness about their surroundings, they may have a harder time caring for their children, the study confirms.“To get the best outcomes for kids and to elicit the best parenting, families need a safe, stable, stimulating environment, both at home and in the surrounding community,” said study co-author Katherine Marcal, an assistant professor of social work at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, N.J.“But if you live in a neighborhood where you can’t go outside, can’t go to a park or can’t walk down the sidewalk because there are...

RSV Vaccine Given in Pregnancy to Help Shield Newborns...

22 September 2023
RSV Vaccine Given in Pregnancy to Help Shield Newborns Receives Full U.S. ApprovalFRIDAY, Sept. 22, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Women may soon have a vaccine they can take during a pregnancy to help protect their newborn from respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).Following approval one month ago by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday also approved the shot, called Abrysvo. That marks the last hurdle needed for the vaccine to become widely available.“This is another new tool we can use this fall and winter to help protect lives,” CDC Director Dr. Mandy Cohen said in an agency press release. “I encourage parents to talk to their doctors about how to protect their little ones against serious RSV illness, using either a vaccine given during pregnancy, or an RSV immunization given to your baby after birth.” ...

Babies May Leave Cells Behind That Help Mom Prepare for...

21 September 2023
Babies May Leave Cells Behind That Help Mom Prepare for Future PregnanciesTHURSDAY, Sept. 21, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- One pregnancy may leave behind microscopic souvenirs that prepare a mom's immune system for the next one, a new study suggests.Experts said the research, carried out in lab mice, offers new insights into a longstanding puzzle: Why doesn't a pregnant woman's immune system attack the fetus, which is essentially a foreign invader?Scientists do not fully understand how that immune tolerance works. But the new findings suggest that once a woman has a healthy pregnancy, that fetus leaves behind tiny populations of cells that help maintain a hospitable environment for the next pregnancy.The hope is that research like this will eventually lead to ways to prevent pregnancy complications -- including pre-eclampsia, preterm birth and stillbirth,...

In Mississippi, a Huge Jump in Cases of Babies Born With Syphilis

21 September 2023
In Mississippi, a Huge Jump in Cases of Babies Born With SyphilisTHURSDAY, Sept. 21, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- The United States is experiencing an alarming wave of congenital syphilis, and one southern state saw a 1,000% rise in babies born with the infection between 2016 and 2022.The number of babies born with the infection in Mississippi rose from 10 in 2016 to 110 in 2022. Syphilis is a sexually transmitted bacterial infection. Congenital syphilis occurs when an infected mother passes the disease to her unborn infant."This sort of mirrors what we've seen in the country, but like a lot of things, because of our health disparities in Mississippi, adverse trends across the country tend to get concentrated in our state," said senior researcher Dr. Thomas Dobbs, dean of the School of Population Health at the University of Mississippi Medical Center in...
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