Latest Women's Health News

15Apr
2021

Even Before COVID, Many More People Died Early in U.S. Versus Europe

Even Before COVID, Many More People Died Early in U.S. Versus EuropeTHURSDAY, April 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Americans were living shorter lives and dying at a significantly higher rate than the citizens of wealthy European countries even before the COVID-19 pandemic struck, a new study reports.The United States suffered more than 400,000 excess deaths in 2017 alone, pre-COVID, compared to the combined populations of France, Germany, Italy, Spain, England and Wales, said senior researcher Samuel Preston, a professor of sociology with the University of Pennsylvania Population Studies Center, in Philadelphia.By this measure, about one in seven U.S. deaths that occurred in 2017 was in excess of the European death rate, the researchers said. Lifestyle choices — from overeating to smoking and drug use — play a major role in the divide.There's been a...

Rashes Can Occur After COVID Vaccine,  But...

15 April 2021
Rashes Can Occur After COVID Vaccine,  But Dermatologists Say `Don`t Worry`THURSDAY, April 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Dermatologists liken skin to a window that can reveal what is going on inside the body, and a rash that sometimes follows a COVID-19 vaccine is one example.When you get the shot, your immune system activates, preparing to recognize and fight off the virus in the future. This response and the inflammation that goes with it can occasionally result in a rash. But experts say as long as it happens more than four hours after the shot, there's no need to worry.Skin reactions like hives or swelling that appear within four hours, however, may be a sign of a rare but severe allergic reaction, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.Dr. Esther Freeman is principal investigator in charge of a registry that tracks skin reactions...

Most Young Americans Eager to Get COVID Vaccine: Poll

15 April 2021
Most Young Americans Eager to Get COVID Vaccine: Poll THURSDAY, April 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Many American teens and young adults are now embracing the chance to get COVID-19 vaccines, a new survey finds.But youth-focused messaging will still be needed to convince a minority of those aged 14 to 24 that they should be vaccinated, the University of Michigan researchers said. Still, the good news is that more young people are ready to get their shots than said they were ready to do so last fall.The first text-message-based MyVoice national survey in October 2020 found that 76% of the 911 teen and young adult respondents said they were willing to get vaccinated, but that included 33% who said their final decision depended on additional information. And 20% of the respondents said they weren't willing to get vaccinated.An analysis of a...

AHA News: The Link Between Structural Racism, High Blood...

15 April 2021
AHA News: The Link Between Structural Racism, High Blood Pressure and Black People`s HealthTHURSDAY, April 15, 2021 (American Heart Association News) -- High blood pressure. Structural racism.What do they have in common?Researchers say they are two of the biggest factors responsible for the gap in poor heart and brain health between Black and white adults in the United States. And they are inextricably linked.Studies show high blood pressure, also called hypertension, affects Black adults – particularly women – earlier and more dramatically than their white peers. By age 55, research shows 3 of 4 Black adults have already developed the condition compared to about half of white men and 40% of white women.Untreated, high blood pressure can lead to a range of disabling and potentially fatal chronic illnesses, including heart disease, stroke, dementia, kidney disease, sexual...

AHA News: Waist Size May Better Predict AFib Risk in Men

15 April 2021
AHA News: Waist Size May Better Predict AFib Risk in MenTHURSDAY, April 15, 2021 (American Heart Association News) -- Body mass index may be more helpful in predicting the risk of a common type of irregular heartbeat in women, while waist size may better predict that risk in men, new research suggests.The link between obesity and atrial fibrillation, or AFib – when the heart beats irregularly and often too fast – is well established. But researchers wanted to understand the extent to which body fat distribution might predict AFib risk among men and women.The researchers analyzed BMI, waist circumference and electrocardiogram data gathered between 2008 and 2013 from more than 2 million older adults in the U.S. and United Kingdom who didn't have cardiovascular conditions, including heart failure and stroke. The study's lead author, Dr....
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