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8Apr
2020

Newborns With COVID-19 May Suffer Only Mild Symptoms, Study Says

WEDNESDAY, April 8, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Newborns with COVID-19 may get by with only mild infection symptoms, a small, new study suggests. Researchers at Wuhan University in China identified four newborns with the COVID-19 coronavirus. All were born to mothers with COVID-19 and delivered by cesarean section. Three were separated from their mothers at birth. None of the babies developed serious symptoms or required intensive care or mechanical ventilation, according to the study in the April 8 European Respiratory Journal. "COVID-19 is highly contagious and our study suggests that intrauterine transmission cannot be ruled out, but that the prognosis is good for both pregnant women and newborn babies," study author Zhi-Jiang Zhang said in a journal news release. He is an associate...

Are Steroids Really the Answer for Arthritic Knees?

8 April 2020
WEDNESDAY, April 8, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Folks with knee arthritis will get more out of physical therapy than a cortisone shot, a new clinical trial argues. People with osteoarthritis of the knee had less pain and disability after one year of physical therapy than others who received as many as three injections during that same period, according to study results. "We found that the steroid injection did not have any advantages over physical therapy," said lead researcher Gail Deyle, a physical therapist and professor at the Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, Texas. Deyle hopes these findings will spark a change in the way knee arthritis is treated. Only about 10% of patients with knee arthritis are offered physical therapy prior to requiring a total knee replacement,...

FDA OKs Generic Asthma Inhaler in Face of...

8 April 2020
WEDNESDAY, April 8, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The first generic albuterol inhaler in the United States was approved Wednesday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in response to inhaler shortages caused by the coronavirus pandemic. The inhalers are widely used by people with asthma, but it's become more difficult to get them because they're being used to treat patients with COVID-19. "The FDA recognizes the increased demand for albuterol products during the novel coronavirus pandemic," FDA Commissioner Dr. Stephen Hahn said in an agency news release. "We remain deeply committed to facilitating access to medical products to help address critical needs of the American public," he added. Manufacturer Cipla Limited received approval for the first generic version of Proventil HFA...

In Nonsmokers, COPD May Up Lung Cancer Risk

8 April 2020
WEDNESDAY, April 8, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Nonsmokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a greater risk for lung cancer, a new study indicates. In fact, their risk is similar to that of smokers without chronic lung disease, researchers found. COPD includes respiratory conditions that narrow the airways, such as bronchitis and emphysema. Smoking is the leading cause of both COPD and lung cancer. But up to 39% of people who develop COPD have never smoked, and their lung cancer risk has been unclear due to a lack of studies. To learn more, researchers analyzed data from more than 338,500 adults, ages 40 to 84, in South Korea who had no history of lung cancer. Their health was tracked for an average of seven years. During that time, 1,834 participants developed...

U.S. Suicide Rate Climbed 35% in Two Decades

8 April 2020
WEDNESDAY, April 8, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. suicide rate has jumped 35% in the past two decades, health officials reported Wednesday. From 1999 to 2018, the suicide rate rose from 10.5 to 14 per 100,000, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Researchers found the rate of suicide rose by about 1% a year from 1999 to 2006, then increased to 2% a year from 2006 through 2018. The report also shows that men are more likely to die by suicide than women, and people in rural areas are at greater risk than their urban counterparts. "This report shows that there continues to be differences in suicide rates by sex, age group and urban and rural location," said lead researcher Dr. Holly Hedegaard, an injury epidemiologist at CDC's...

Many Americans Will Grieve Parents, Grandparents Lost to Coronavirus

8 April 2020
WEDNESDAY, April 8, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- As deaths from coronavirus continue to mount, researchers are calling attention to another toll of the pandemic: the many people left behind to grieve, in a time of social isolation. Losing a loved one is a traumatic event at any time. But experts say the ongoing crisis presents unique difficulties for people in mourning -- from the suddenness of the loss, to the societal shifts happening around it. And a huge number of people will be affected in the months to come. "This will be a mortality shock that the U.S. has never experienced," said Emily Smith-Greenaway, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Southern California, in Los Angeles. Greenaway and colleague Ashton Verdery recently published an analysis estimating how...

China's Controls May Have Headed Off 700,000 COVID-19 Cases: Study

8 April 2020
WEDNESDAY, April 8, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Extensive controls imposed early in China's coronavirus outbreak may have prevented hundreds of thousands of infections, a new study suggests. Researchers analyzed the movements of people out of Wuhan (where the virus was first detected), the types and timing of controls across China, and COVID-19 cases reported each day in every city. The conclusion: Controls imposed during the China outbreak's first 50 days may have delayed spread of the virus to other cities by several days, preventing more than 700,000 infections across the country. The authors said the findings -- recently published in the journal Science -- could be helpful for countries still in early phases of the COVID-19 outbreak. "The number of confirmed cases in China by day...

Family Ties Help Young Adults With Type 1 Diabetes Flourish

8 April 2020
WEDNESDAY, April 8, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Type 1 diabetes is a challenging, time-intensive disease that often strikes children, and new research suggests that strong family support helps improve the well-being of young adults with the condition. The study found that young adults (under 30) with type 1 diabetes were more likely to be "flourishing" if they had good family connections. Flourishing was defined in the study as having a general sense of well-being, including having a purpose in life, feeling self-acceptance, and having positive relationships with others. "Communication and connection with parents is super-important throughout human development, but type 1 diabetes can become a rupturing event for some families. The stress of the disease can be more than some families...

Touching Your Face Is a Coronavirus Danger: Tips to Help...

WEDNESDAY, April 8, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- You've been told over and over not to touch your face during the coronavirus pandemic, but that's easier said than done. Most people touch their face...

School Closures Could Be Adding to Kids' Waistlines

WEDNESDAY, April 8, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- One side effect of the coronavirus pandemic could be long-lasting: U.S. school closures may worsen the child obesity crisis, experts warn. Previous...
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