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30Sep
2020

HPV Vaccine Proves Its Mettle Against Cervical Cancer

HPV Vaccine Proves Its Mettle Against Cervical CancerWEDNESDAY, Sept. 30, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Girls who are vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV) may drastically cut their chances of developing cervical cancer by age 30, a huge, new study finds. Researchers found that of more than 1.6 million young Swedish women, those who'd gotten the HPV vaccine were about two-thirds less likely to be diagnosed with cervical cancer than their unvaccinated peers. Those odds were further slashed when the vaccine was given before age 17. Among those women, the risk of cervical cancer was 88% lower. Experts said the findings, published Oct. 1 in the New England Journal of Medicine, support longstanding recommendations: Girls should be vaccinated against HPV before their teenage years. "These findings aren't surprising. This is what we'd...

Pancreas Size, Shape Can Return to Normal in Diabetes...

30 September 2020
Pancreas Size, Shape Can Return to Normal in Diabetes Remission: StudyWEDNESDAY, Sept. 30, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Reversing type 2 diabetes can restore the pancreas to its normal size and shape, a new study finds. Previous research found that with remission of type 2 diabetes through significant weight loss, natural insulin-production can return to levels similar to people who have never had diabetes. The new study is the first to show that reversing diabetes can also affect the size and shape of the pancreas, the researchers said. The study included 64 people with type 2 diabetes and a control group 64 people without diabetes whose pancreas health was monitored for two years. At the start of the study, average pancreas volume was 20% smaller and organ borders were more irregular in people with diabetes than in the control group. After five months...

Why Early Bedtime May Be Best for People With Type 2...

30 September 2020
Why Early Bedtime May Be Best for People With Type 2 DiabetesWEDNESDAY, Sept. 30, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- It's long been said that early to bed, early to rise can make you healthy, wealthy and wise. Now, new research supports at least the health benefits. A study of people with type 2 diabetes found that night owls -- people who go to bed late and get up late -- tend to get little exercise, putting their health at greater risk. Understanding how sleep time can affect physical activity might help people with type 2 diabetes manage their health, said researcher Dr. Joseph Henson of the University of Leicester in the United Kingdom. "There is a massive need for large-scale interventions to help people with diabetes initiate, maintain and achieve the benefits of an active lifestyle," he said. "For people who prefer to go to bed later and get...

Dangerous Ink: Tattoos Might Lead to Body's Overheating

30 September 2020
Dangerous Ink: Tattoos Might Lead to Body`s OverheatingWEDNESDAY, Sept. 30, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Using your body as a canvas for tattoos might come at a price for your health. New research suggests that all that ink impedes natural sweating -- and that might cause the body to overheat. The study found that tattooed skin on arms "has reduced sweat rates, and thus potential heat loss capacity, during [whole-body heating], compared to adjacent skin without tattoos." One dermatologist unconnected to the study said the finding is potentially alarming. Any tattoo-linked decline in sweating "may have important ramification when patients have fever or illness or are overheated and may have problems with thermoregulation," said Dr. Michele Green, a dermatologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. She believes that "more studies need...

Mental Health Issues Double the Odds of Dying With COVID-19, Study Finds

30 September 2020
Mental Health Issues Double the Odds of Dying With COVID-19, Study FindsWEDNESDAY, Sept. 30, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- People suffering from a psychiatric disorder could be more than twice as likely to die if they become infected with COVID-19, a new study suggests. Folks diagnosed with any type of psychiatric problem -- anxiety or depression, dementia, psychosis -- were up to 2.3 times more likely to die in the hospital from COVID-19, researchers found. "Those who had COVID who had a prior psychiatric diagnosis had a higher mortality," said lead researcher Dr. Luming Li. She's an assistant professor of psychiatry at the Yale University School of Medicine and medical director of clinical operations at the Yale New Haven Health System. Li and her colleagues tracked the health of 1,685 patients hospitalized at Yale New Haven Health, a five-hospital system...

What Foods, Medicines Can Lower Your Colon Cancer Risk?

30 September 2020
What Foods, Medicines Can Lower Your Colon Cancer Risk?WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Certain nutrients, foods and medicines may help protect you against colon cancer, a large research review suggests. A team of international researchers led by Dr. Marc Bardou, of Dijon Bourgogne University Hospital in France, reviewed about 80 studies that examined how diet and certain medicines affected colon cancer risk. The studies were published between September 1980 and June 2019. In terms of medicines, aspirin (a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, or NSAID) appears to lower the risk by 14% to 29% at doses as low as 75 milligrams (mg)/day and as high as 325 mg/day. The use of NSAIDs for up to five years was associated with a 26% to 43% reduction in incidence. High intake of folic acid, a B vitamin, was associated with up to a...

More U.S. Women Using Marijuana to Help Ease Menopause: Study

30 September 2020
More U.S. Women Using Marijuana to Help Ease Menopause: StudyWEDNESDAY, Sept. 30, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- A growing number of middle-aged women are turning to marijuana to help soothe symptoms of menopause, new research indicates. About one-third of older female U.S. veterans said they had either tried to treat their menopause symptoms with cannabis products or planned to experiment with marijuana in the future, according to results presented this week at the virtual annual meeting of the North American Menopause Society. "These findings suggest that cannabis use for menopause symptom management is common, raising questions about the symptoms being targeted, and if this approach is helpful or harmful," said lead investigator Carolyn Gibson. She's a psychologist and health services researcher with the San Francisco VA Health Care...

Obamacare Means 2 Million Fewer Americans Face Catastrophic Medical Bills Each Year

30 September 2020
Obamacare Means 2 Million Fewer Americans Face Catastrophic Medical Bills Each YearWEDNESDAY, Sept. 30, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Since the passage of "Obamacare," fewer Americans are facing insurmountable medical bills -- but the benefit does not seem to be reaching people with private insurance, a new study shows. Researchers found that after the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was implemented, the number of Americans incurring "catastrophic" health care expenses each year dropped -- from 13.6 million in 2010 to 11.2 million in 2017. But while the decline is good news, the 11-million figure is still "staggering," said lead researcher Dr. Charles Liu of Stanford University School of Medicine. In addition, there were no signs that Americans with private insurance have gained protection from financial catastrophe. And those with low incomes remain in greatest...

AHA News: Despite Same Symptoms, Men and Women Don't...

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30, 2020 (American Heart Association News) -- A transient ischemic attack, often called a mini-stroke, usually doesn't last long or cause permanent damage. But it still needs...

AHA News: Lung Injuries Should Be a Warning About...

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30, 2020 (American Heart Association News) -- The patients, most of them young, began showing up at hospitals in the spring of 2019. Some were coughing, out of breath or feverish....
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