Latest Health News

28Feb
2020

Teen Moms at High Risk for Depression, Anxiety

FRIDAY, Feb. 28, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- As if being a teen mom isn't hard enough, two-thirds of young mothers are grappling with at least one mental health issue, researchers say. And close to 40% of mothers under 21 years of age have more than one issue, including depression, anxiety and hyperactivity, according to the research team from McMaster Children's Hospital in Ontario, Canada. That's up to four times higher than in teens who aren't parents and among mothers who are 21 and older, the findings showed. "Now that we understand that young mothers can struggle with problems other than just postpartum depression, our findings can be used to develop better screening processes, more effectively detect mental health problems in teenaged mothers, and direct treatment," said Dr....

Research Finds Contagious Staph in Lupus-Related Skin Rashes

28 February 2020
FRIDAY, Feb. 28, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Skin rashes in people with lupus may have high levels of disease-causing bacteria that can spread to other people, according to a new study. Researchers found that half of rashes in patients with lupus had abnormally high levels of Staphylococcus aureus (or staph), a common bacteria associated with skin infections. That means "the person with the rash is a carrier for the bacteria and can spread it to others," said senior author Dr. J. Michelle Kahlenberg, an associate professor of rheumatology at Michigan Medicine, from the University of Michigan. "In addition, we identified that a protein in the skin of patients with lupus, called interferon, increases the stickiness of staph aureus to their skin," she said in a university news...

More Evidence Tying Vitamin E Acetate to Vapers' Lung...

28 February 2020
FRIDAY, Feb. 28, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have found more evidence from animal studies linking vitamin E acetate in vaping liquids to deadly lung damage in people who use electronic cigarettes. Vitamin E acetate is sometimes used in vaping liquids with THC, the active ingredient in marijuana. Since August, there have been more than 2,800 U.S. cases of EVALI (e-cigarette- or vaping-associated lung injury), resulting in 68 deaths, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Previous CDC research found that inhaling vitamin E acetate was strongly associated with EVALI, and this study offers new evidence in support. "We show conclusively that when vaped, vitamin E acetate, which is often used as a cutting agent in e-cigarette liquids containing THC,...

Med Schools More Diverse Now, But Study Finds...

28 February 2020
FRIDAY, Feb. 28, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Race, gender and sexual orientation are tied to mistreatment of medical school students by faculty, physicians and fellow students, according to a new report. For the study, Yale University researchers analyzed more than 27,500 surveys of students at 140 accredited medical schools in the United States. The researchers found that women, Asians, under-represented minorities, and students who are multiracial, as well as those who are gay, lesbian or bisexual were mistreated more often than classmates who are straight, white and male. "There is a lot of data showing that although medical schools are slowly becoming more diverse, they are still not yet inclusive," said study co-author Dr. Dowin Boatright, an assistant professor of emergency...

Weight-Loss Surgery Works, No Matter How Long Patient Was Obese

28 February 2020
FRIDAY, Feb. 28, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Weight-loss surgery is as effective for people who became obese before age 20 as for older patients, new research shows. For the study, researchers from the University of Gothenburg, in Sweden, analyzed data from just over 4,000 obese adults. Half had undergone weight-loss surgery, half did not. They were divided into three groups based on their body mass index (BMI) at age 20: normal, overweight, and obese. (BMI is an estimate of body fat based on height and weight.) The results came as somewhat of a surprise to the researchers. They expected that weight-loss surgery would have fewer health benefits for patients who were already obese by age 20. "But it wasn't like that," said study co-author Johanna Andersson-Assarsson, a researcher in...

China Study Puts Coronavirus Death Rate at 1.4%; Real Number May Be Lower

28 February 2020
FRIDAY, Feb. 28, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The latest tally of almost 1,100 cases of COVID-19 infection from 30 Chinese provinces shows a fatality rate of 1.4% during the early phase of the outbreak. That's much higher than the rate seen with the seasonal flu, where only about 0.1% of cases end in death. But it's far below the mortality rate of recent coronavirus outbreaks like SARS (9 to 10%) or MERS (36%), noted Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). Furthermore, the 1.4% figure cited in the new Chinese report, published Feb. 28 in the New England Journal of Medicine, is probably higher than the "real" death rate, Fauci added. That's because many coronavirus cases are so mild they're not even being reported, Fauci...

For Black Americans, Exercise Brings Real Boost to Life After Cancer

28 February 2020
FRIDAY, Feb. 28, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Regular exercise can benefit black cancer survivors' physical and mental health, but most don't get the recommended amount of activity, a new study says. Cancer survivors should get at least 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity a week, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS). For most cancers, black patients have a higher risk of dying from their disease than other racial or ethnic groups, but lower levels of physical activity, researchers pointed out. "Identifying barriers to participation in regular exercise and developing interventions to reduce these barriers in African-American cancer survivors will be critical for improving outcomes in this population and minimizing cancer health disparities," lead author...

At High Risk for Heart Disease? Strict Blood Pressure Control Should Help

28 February 2020
FRIDAY, Feb. 28, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- If you're at high risk for heart disease, lowering your blood pressure below the standard target level may help extend your life, a new study suggests. Specifically, a systolic blood pressure target of less than 120 mm Hg -- rather than the standard 140 mm Hg -- could give someone an extra six months to three years of life, depending on their age when they begin intensive blood pressure control. Systolic blood pressure is the top number in a blood pressure reading. "Our hope is that these findings offer a more easily communicated message when discussing the potential benefits and risks of sustained blood pressure control over time," said lead study author Dr. Muthiah Vaduganathan, a cardiologist at Brigham & Women's Hospital in...

Doctors' Ratings Tank When Patients Are Kept Waiting: Study

FRIDAY, Feb. 28, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Tick-tock: A long delay in the waiting room annoys some patients so much that they give their doctors lower ratings, a new study finds. "Waiting to see...

AHA News: Could Sunshine Lower Blood Pressure? Study...

FRIDAY, Feb. 28, 2020 (American Heart Association News) -- Exposure to sunshine is linked to lower blood pressure, says a new study that included hundreds of thousands of patients at dialysis...
RSS
1345678910Last

Theme picker

HealthDay

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.