Latest Health News

8Dec
2019

How to Avoid Stained Teeth When You Enjoy Red Wine

SUNDAY, Dec. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- You don't have to wind up with stained teeth if you toast the holidays with red wine, an expert says. "The strength of your enamel and how prone you are to plaque buildup is key to how much your teeth might stain," said Dr. Uchenna Akosa, head of Rutgers Health University Dental Associates, the faculty practice of Rutgers School of Dental Medicine in New Brunswick, N.J. Akosa called red wine a "triple threat" to a sparkling smile. "When you drink red wine, you're encountering a triple threat to your teeth's whiteness: anthocyanins, which are the pigments in grapes that give red wine its rich color; tannins, which help bind the pigment to your teeth; and the acidity found in wine, which etches your enamel, making it more porous and it easier...

CBD Medicine May Help Ease Another Form of Seizure

7 December 2019
SATURDAY, Dec. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Prescription-grade CBD may help control hard-to-treat seizures caused by a rare genetic disorder, a preliminary study suggests. The study involved 224 patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) -- a genetic condition that affects about one in 6,000 people, according to the U.S. National Institutes of Health. It causes noncancerous tumors to arise throughout the body, and -- in 90% of patients -- seizures that are often resistant to standard drugs. Researchers wanted to know whether these patients might respond to Epidiolex, a liquid medication that contains purified CBD (cannabidiol). Last year, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Epidiolex for two other rare seizure disorders: Dravet syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome....

Good Workouts Might Extend a Woman's Life

7 December 2019
SATURDAY, Dec. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you can tackle a tough workout, that may bode well for your longevity, new research suggests. A woman's risk of dying from heart disease, cancer or other causes is much lower if she can engage in vigorous exercise, scientists report. The new study included more than 4,700 middle-aged and older women, average age 64, who were referred for treadmill exercise echocardiography because they had known or suspected coronary artery disease. The women walked or ran on a treadmill with a gradual increase in intensity, and continued until they were exhausted. During a median follow-up of 4.6 years, there were 345 heart-related deaths, 164 cancer deaths and 203 deaths from other causes. After adjusting for other factors, the researchers concluded...

Healthy Lifestyle, Regular Screening May Keep Cancer at Bay

6 December 2019
FRIDAY, Dec. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A healthy lifestyle might be your best defense against cancer, an expert says. About 42% of cancer cases and 45% of cancer deaths are attributable to modifiable risk factors, according to the American Cancer Society. "Modifiable risk factors are behaviors within one's control, such as eating right, not smoking, and being physically active," said Dr. Michael Hall, chair of the Department of Clinical Genetics at the Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia. "However, some risk factors cannot be controlled, such as family history or getting older. That's why getting regular recommended cancer screenings may be just as important as living a healthy lifestyle," he said in a center news release. Screening increases the chance of detecting certain...

Virtual Doc Visits Suffice for Many With Neurological Disorders

6 December 2019
FRIDAY, Dec. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you have a neurological disorder, a video chat with your doctor might be as good as an office visit for checking on your condition. That's the conclusion of researchers who analyzed 101 studies on telemedicine use for concussion, traumatic brain injury, dementia, epilepsy, headache, multiple sclerosis, movement disorders, neuromuscular conditions and general neurology. In telemedicine, video conferencing or other technology is used to connect patients and doctors who are in different locations. The patient could be at home or at a local doctor's office. Overall, the review found that patients and their doctors were as satisfied with virtual visits as with in-person visits. Some of the studies showed that telemedicine is as effective as...

Houseflies: Just How Bad Are They for Your Health?

6 December 2019
FRIDAY, Dec. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Everyone quickly shoos houseflies off their dinner plates, but exactly how disease-ridden are these pesky insects? New research reveals that flies do pick up plenty of microbes from the nearby environment -- germs that can then be transmitted to your food or drink. But there's also reason to relax: Experts agreed that houseflies don't rank high on the list of disease threats. Even though flies do carry germs, "the chances that these microbes will cause any harm are low," concluded study lead author Rahel Park, a Ph.D.-candidate at the VIB-KU Leuven Center for Microbiology, in Belgium. Park's team sought to get the latest buzz on houseflies by producing a genetic map of the microbial community found both inside a housefly and on its surface....

Domestic Abuse Can Leave Legacy of Poor Health

6 December 2019
FRIDAY, Dec. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Women with a history of domestic abuse are more likely to develop chronic conditions that cause pain and fatigue, a new study says. British researchers examined medical records of more than 18,500 women who had suffered domestic abuse between 1995 and 2017 and more than 74,000 who had not been abused, to compare rates of fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Fibromyalgia causes widespread body pain, while CFS causes extreme tiredness and other symptoms. The survivors of domestic abuse were twice as likely to have fibromyalgia and CFS than others, according to the study published Dec. 6 in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence. "Domestic abuse is a global public health issue, with as many as 1 in 3 women affected worldwide," said...

FDA Approves First Generic Forms of MS Drug Gilenya

6 December 2019
FRIDAY, Dec. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The first generic versions of the multiple sclerosis drug Gilenya have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The three generic versions of Gilenya (fingolimod) capsules were approved for the treatment of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) in adults. "Approving safe and effective generics so patients have more treatment options continues to be a priority for the FDA," Dr. Janet Woodcock, director of the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said in an agency news release. "Having access to affordable treatments is important for patients with conditions that require ongoing care." Many MS patients have periods of worsening function and onset of new symptoms (relapses) that are initially followed by periods of...

FDA Testing Levels of Carcinogen in Diabetes Drug Metformin

FRIDAY, Dec. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Levels of possible cancer-causing chemicals in metformin diabetes medications are under investigation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Metformin...

AHA News: Here's How Black Barbershops Could Save Lives...

FRIDAY, Dec. 6, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- A national program to fight high blood pressure by sending pharmacists to black barbershops could prevent thousands of strokes, heart...
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