Latest Health News

18Oct
2021

More Middle-Aged, Older Women Getting  'Broken Heart' Syndrome

More Middle-Aged, Older Women Getting  `Broken Heart` SyndromeMONDAY, Oct. 18, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The number of Americans diagnosed with "broken heart" syndrome has steadily risen in the past 15 years — with the vast majority being women, a new study finds.The condition, which doctors call stress cardiomyopathy, appears similar to a heart attack — with symptoms such as chest pain and breathlessness. But its cause is entirely different: Experts believe it reflects a temporary weakness in the heart muscle owing to a surge in stress hormones. The condition got its nickname because it may arise within days of an emotionally difficult event, like the death of a loved one or a divorce. But other stressful situations, from a traffic accident to undergoing surgery, can also be triggers.Most people fully recover from this type of broken heart,...

Why Are Gulf Coast Welders Dying From Anthrax-Like Disease?

18 October 2021
Why Are Gulf Coast Welders Dying From Anthrax-Like Disease?MONDAY, Oct. 18, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- A common group of bacteria may be causing deadly pneumonia or anthrax-like disease among metalworkers in the southern United States, health officials report.The bacteria, called Bacillus cereus (B. cereus), naturally occurs in soil and dust. B. cereus can cause food poisoning and anthrax-like disease, but why it singles out welders and other metalworkers is a mystery, according to researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.Also a puzzle is why it has only been reported in Gulf Coast states. "In the past, long-term exposure to welding and metalworking fumes has been associated with various forms of lung injury that can cause changes in lung function and increase susceptibility to lung infections, including fatal...

Out-of-Pocket Medical Bills for COVID-19 May Average...

18 October 2021
Out-of-Pocket Medical Bills for COVID-19 May Average $3,800 in 2021: StudyMONDAY, Oct. 18, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Americans hospitalized with COVID-19 could now face thousands of dollars in out-of-pocket medical costs, according to a new report.In 2020, most health insurance companies waived co-pays, deductibles and other cost-sharing for hospitalized COVID-19 patients, but many stopped doing that early this year, the University of Michigan researchers noted."Many insurers claim that it is justified to charge patients for COVID-19 hospitalizations now that COVID-19 vaccines are widely available," said study lead author Dr. Kao-Ping Chua, a health policy researcher and pediatrician at Michigan Medicine, in Ann Arbor."However, some people hospitalized for COVID-19 aren't eligible for vaccines, such as young children, while others are vaccinated patients who...

AHA News: Your Next Doctor's Prescription Might Be to...

18 October 2021
AHA News: Your Next Doctor`s Prescription Might Be to Spend Time in NatureMONDAY, Oct. 18, 2021 (American Heart Association News) -- Dr. Robert Zarr loves to write prescriptions that you don't have to take to the pharmacy.Instead, he sends patients outside to soak in the healing powers of nature, combining the benefits of exercise with the therapeutic effects of fresh air and green space."Going back millions of years, we've evolved outdoors," said Zarr, a pediatrician who recently relocated to Ottawa, Canada, from Washington, D.C. "Why should we exist indoors? We need to be outdoors. The health benefits of being in nature are obvious."The idea isn't new. The 16th century Swiss physician Paracelsus declared that "the art of healing comes from nature, not from the physician." In Japan, public health experts promote shinrin-yoku, or forest bathing, as a key to...

Powell's COVID Death Despite Vaccination Shows Danger to Those With Weakened Immune Systems

18 October 2021
Powell`s COVID Death Despite Vaccination Shows Danger to Those With Weakened Immune SystemsMONDAY, Oct. 18, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Colin Powell, the first Black person to become Secretary of State and a military leader who helped shape U.S. foreign policy for decades, died Monday of complications from COVID-19. He was 84."General Colin L. Powell, former U.S. Secretary of State and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, passed away this morning due to complications from COVID-19," the Powell family wrote in a Facebook post. "We have lost a remarkable and loving husband, father, grandfather and a great American," they said, noting he was fully vaccinated. Powell becomes one of the most high-profile American public figures to die after having a "breakthrough" coronavirus infection, although there were factors that raised his risk of severe COVID-19 infection greatly, experts...

Researchers Find Better Way to Fight Breast Cancer That Has Spread to Brain

18 October 2021
Researchers Find Better Way to Fight Breast Cancer That Has Spread to BrainMONDAY, Oct. 18, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers may have found a noninvasive way to temporarily open the brain's borders to allow tumor-fighting medication inside.By necessity, the brain is shielded by a layer of specialized cells called the blood-brain barrier. Its job is to allow needed substances in -- like oxygen and sugar -- while keeping out substances that could be toxic.Unfortunately, that means medications often cannot penetrate the brain to any great extent to treat tumors or damaged tissue.Now scientists are reporting a first: They used an advanced ultrasound technique to noninvasively -- and temporarily -- open the blood-brain barrier in four patients with breast cancer that had spread to the brain.That allowed the researchers to deliver the drug trastuzumab...

State Spending on Poverty Really Pays Off for Kids: Study

18 October 2021
State Spending on Poverty Really Pays Off for Kids: StudyMONDAY, Oct. 18, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- When states spend money on programs that reduce poverty, fewer children are abused and neglected, fewer end up in foster care and fewer die, a new study reveals.Researchers found that for every additional $1,000 that states spent on federal, state and local benefit programs per person living in poverty, there was a 4% reduction in substantiated child abuse, a 2% reduction in foster care placements and about an 8% reduction in fatalities. Many people would say this is reason enough to direct public spending in this way. Yet, there's also a fiscal advantage to doing so because investments in these programs may offset some of the long-term costs, according to the study. "Child abuse and neglect is a public health crisis and it needs a public...

How 1.3 Million Americans Became Controlled by Conservatorships

18 October 2021
How 1.3 Million Americans Became Controlled by ConservatorshipsMONDAY, Oct. 18, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Pop singer Britney Spears was at the height of her fame in 2008 when, through a series of arcane legal maneuverings, her father gained conservatorship over her and took control of her personal and financial affairs.Spears' plight and the #FreeBritney movement has shone a bright spotlight on America's guardianship system, which experts say is shrouded in secrecy, ripe for abuse and in desperate need of reform.About 1.3 million guardianship or conservatorship cases are active at any given time in the United States, managing assets that total at least $50 billion for people whose rights have essentially been stripped from them, according to the National Council on Disability.Most guardianships are run by family members and benefit the person who's...

Legionnaires' Disease Outbreak Hits Long Island, N.Y.

MONDAY, Oct. 18, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Health officials say they are trying to track down the source of 10 reported cases of Legionnaires' disease within a one-mile radius in a Long Island,...

Bill Clinton Discharged From Hospital After Recovery...

MONDAY, Oct. 18, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Former President Bill Clinton was released from a California hospital on Sunday after being treated for sepsis. Clinton, 75, was admitted for care at the...
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