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6Feb
2020

Do Young Adults Really 'Age Out' of Heavy Drinking?

Do Young Adults Really `Age Out` of Heavy Drinking?THURSDAY, Feb. 6, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- During the late teens and early 20s, young people may booze it up a lot, but they eventually dial it back, right? A new study study confirms that drinking rates do tend to decrease after college age. But on an individual level, it all depends on various factors such as the drinker's social networks and personality. "It's almost become a myth that people mature out of alcohol use in later adolescence and young adulthood," said study author Michael Windle, chairman of the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University in Atlanta. Windle's study of more than 1,000 men and women found that young adults tend to continue the alcohol use of their teen years -- be it light, moderate or heavy drinking, though moderate and heavy drinkers...

Workers With Cluster Headaches Take Twice as Many Sick Days

6 February 2020
Workers With Cluster Headaches Take Twice as Many Sick DaysTHURSDAY, Feb. 6, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- People afflicted with cluster headaches miss work twice as often as colleagues without the debilitating headaches, a new study finds. Cluster headaches are extremely painful headaches that last from 15 minutes to three hours, for many days, or even weeks, in a row. They're more common in men. For the study, Swedish researchers compared more than 3,200 working-age people who get cluster headaches with 16,200 people who don't have them. In 2010, headache sufferers averaged 16 sick days, compared to just under seven days for the headache-free group, the findings showed. When disability days were added in, people with cluster headaches averaged 63 missed workdays a year. Those without headaches averaged 34. And those with less education...

Gene Variation May Protect Against Alzheimer's: Study

6 February 2020
Gene Variation May Protect Against Alzheimer`s: StudyTHURSDAY, Feb. 6, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- A breakthrough study has identified a class of natural gene variants that may protect against Alzheimer's disease. For the study, researchers at University College London analyzed DNA from more than 10,000 people -- half with Alzheimer's and half without. The investigators found that these gene variants reduce the functioning of proteins called tyrosine phosphatases. These proteins impair the activity of a cell signaling pathway important for cell survival, explained the authors of the study published online Feb. 5 in the Annals of Human Genetics. The pathway could be a key target for drugs to treat Alzheimer's, and the study authors said that the findings provide more evidence that other genes may be linked to one's risk for the memory...

More Americans to Be Evacuated From China; 12th...

6 February 2020
More Americans to Be Evacuated From China; 12th Coronavirus Case ReportedTHURSDAY, Feb. 6, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- More Americans are expected to be evacuated from the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak in China, as U.S. health officials reported a 12th domestic case of coronavirus late Wednesday. Earlier Wednesday, two planes carrying 350 Americans landed at an Air Force base in California. Some of those passengers were then flown to Marine Corps Air Station Miramar near San Diego. Both groups were put under a 14-day quarantine, U.S. health officials said. At least one more plane is expected to fly more American evacuees to military bases in Nebraska and Texas this week, The New York Times reported. In total, more than 500 Americans have already been evacuated. The first group of evacuees, who were flown out of Wuhan, China, a week ago, were moved...

Young-Onset Parkinson's May Start in the Womb, New Research Suggests

5 February 2020
Young-Onset Parkinson`s May Start in the Womb, New Research SuggestsWEDNESDAY, Feb. 5, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- People who develop Parkinson's disease at a younger age (before age 50) may have malfunctioning brain cells at birth, according to a study that also identified a drug that may help these patients. At least 500,000 people in the United States are diagnosed with Parkinson's each year. Most are 60 or older at diagnosis, but about 10% are between 21 and 50. Parkinson's is a neurological disease that occurs when brain neurons that make dopamine become impaired or die. Dopamine helps coordinate muscle movement. Symptoms get worse over time and include slow gait, rigidity, tremors and loss of balance. There is currently no cure. "Young-onset Parkinson's is especially heartbreaking because it strikes people at the prime of life," said study...

Vitamin D in Pregnancy Doesn't Curb Kids' Asthma

5 February 2020
Vitamin D in Pregnancy Doesn`t Curb Kids` AsthmaWEDNESDAY, Feb. 5, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Taking higher doses of vitamin D during pregnancy doesn't appear to offer any protection against asthma in children, a new study finds. The study, a follow-up to one done three years ago, looked at 6-year-old children whose mothers had taken extra vitamin D while they were pregnant. The hope was that taking extra vitamin D when the baby's lungs are developing during pregnancy might prevent asthma. In the earlier study, the vitamin had shown some impact on 3-year-old children. In the current study, the impact was gone. "Lung development begins in utero, and animal studies have shown that vitamin D is important for development," said study lead author Dr. Augusto Litonjua. He's a professor of pediatrics and medicine at the University of...

Many Seniors Think They See Better Than They Actually Do

5 February 2020
Many Seniors Think They See Better Than They Actually DoWEDNESDAY, Feb. 5, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Many older people could improve their vision by getting glasses or a new prescription, a new study suggests. Swedish researchers assessed 1,200 70-year-olds and found that most were content with their eyesight, but many overestimated how well they actually see. The study found that 61.5% could significantly improve their vision by getting glasses or changing the power of the ones they already had, researchers said. "We're really healthy and have good eyesight in Sweden, and being 70 doesn't have to mean your vision is poor," said co-author Lena Havstam Johansson, a doctoral student at Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg. "Visual impairment can creep up on you, making it difficult to notice that your eyes are getting worse....

Health Risks Persist for Young Cancer Survivors

5 February 2020
Health Risks Persist for Young Cancer SurvivorsWEDNESDAY, Feb. 5, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Teen and young adult cancer survivors are nearly twice as likely to be hospitalized as those who haven't had cancer, a new study finds. "Few studies have investigated health risk in adolescents and young adults after cancer treatment," said study author Chelsea Anderson, a postdoctoral fellow at the American Cancer Society. She and her colleagues from the University of Utah and the University of North Carolina analyzed data from 6,330 cancer survivors in Utah between ages 15 and 39; about 13,000 of their siblings, and more than 18,000 unrelated people in the same age group without cancer. The risk of a first hospitalization was 1.8 times higher for cancer survivors than for their siblings and 1.9 times higher than for others without...

Wide Variations Found in 'Normal' Resting Heart Rate

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 5, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- A "normal" resting heart rate can vary significantly among individuals, a new study finds. Your heart rate, or pulse, is how many times your heart...

New Gene Study Unravels Cancer's Secrets

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 5, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer is a genetically driven disease, and a mother lode of new genetic data on dozens of different cancers is promising to break open fresh avenues of...
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