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1Jun
2020

COVID 'Immunity Passports:' Not Ready for Prime Time?

MONDAY, June 1, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- A grieving widower played by Matt Damon flashes a shiny coded wristband for security guards to scan in the 2011 movie "Contagion." After a quick beep and a green light, Damon is allowed into a store to buy a prom dress for his daughter. That wristband was an "immunity passport" -- a certification of his character's immunity to the movie's deadly virus. With fiction quickly becoming reality, immunity passports are now being touted as a means to reopen the world following COVID-19 lockdowns. But experts worry that a host of practical and ethical problems make the concept unworkable and potentially dangerous to privacy and liberty. Governments and private businesses are currently developing similar programs that would allow people who have...

Most Americans Still More Worried About COVID-19 Spread...

1 June 2020
MONDAY, June 1, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- As the number of U.S. coronavirus cases neared 1.8 million on Monday, a new poll shows that a majority of Americans still think it's more important to control the virus' spread than to restart the economy. While nearly 6 in 10 Americans say the pandemic has taken a heavy economic toll on their communities, a majority of a divided country still believes that containing COVID-19 infections is paramount, a new Washington Post-ABC News poll shows. Overall, 57 percent of all Americans and 81 percent of Democrats say trying to control the spread of the coronavirus is most important right now. But only 27 percent of Republicans agree, while 66 percent of them say restarting the economy is more critical. Nearly 6 in 10 independents say their priority...

What to Know If You're Headed to College With Asthma or...

31 May 2020
SUNDAY, May 31, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- If you're off to college in the fall and have allergies or asthma, it's not too soon to figure out how you'll manage them. "There are many arrangements to be made as you head off to college for the first time, and your allergies and asthma should not be put on the back burner," said Dr. J. Allen Meadows, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI). "It's important to start managing your health issues well before you leave for school, because there are many details to nail down to ensure you stay well as you study," he said in an ACAAI news release. Here's his advice: Meet with your allergist before school starts. If you're going to a school far away, request a referral to an allergist close to campus. Find out...

Coronavirus Was Already Spreading in U.S. in January: Study

30 May 2020
SATURDAY, May 30, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- More evidence has surfaced that the COVID-19 coronavirus was circulating in the United States as much as a month prior to the first confirmed local case in February, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Friday. Genetic analysis of early cases suggests a single line of coronavirus imported from China began circulating in the United States between Jan. 18 and Feb. 9, followed by several importations from Europe, according to research from the CDC's COVID-19 Response Team. That means the new coronavirus entered the United States weeks before the first documented case of COVID-19 infection from unknown origins -- a California resident who fell ill on Feb. 13 and was confirmed on Feb. 26, the researchers reported. The...

Protect Yourself From Sun to Prevent Skin Cancer

30 May 2020
SATURDAY, May 30, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Headed to the beach or park for a little fresh air? Don't forget your sun protection, the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) advises. Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States, affecting one in five Americans, but many don't protect themselves from harmful UV rays. Sixty percent of respondents to an AAD survey said they had had such a bad sunburn their clothes were uncomfortable, and 43% hurt too much to sleep. "Sunburns are highly preventable, but each year, one in three U.S. adults gets sunburned," said AAD president Dr. Bruce Thiers. "As dermatologists, we know that unprotected exposure to the sun's harmful UV rays is a major risk factor for skin cancer," he said in an academy news release. "It only takes a few...

Very Early-Stage Breast Cancer Ups Long-Term Odds for Invasive Tumors: Study

29 May 2020
FRIDAY, May 29, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Women with cancerous cells in their milk ducts -- also known as DCIS -- are at a high risk for developing fatal breast cancer, British researchers report. DCIS is short for ductal carcinoma in situ, an early form of breast cancer. With stepped-up breast screening, it has become an increasingly common diagnosis. Though it's not immediately life-threatening, DCIS more than doubles a woman's risk of developing an invasive breast cancer and dying from it, according to a large study of tens of thousands of women in the United Kingdom. And the increased risk can persist 20 years or more -- longer than previously thought. But surveillance of women after a DCIS diagnosis typically focuses on the first few years, according to lead author Gurdeep...

High-Potency Pot Tied to Big Rise in Psychiatric Issues

29 May 2020
FRIDAY, May 29, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Marijuana has long been linked to a host of mental health risks, but the potent strains sold today may amplify those dangers, new research suggests. "We know that people who use cannabis are more likely to report mental health problems than those who don't use cannabis, but we don't fully understand how recent increases in the strength and potency of cannabis affects this," explained study author Lindsey Hines, a senior research associate from the University of Bristol Medical School in England. For the study, researchers examined data from a large, ongoing British study and focused on more than 1,000 people who were born in the early 1990s and reported recent pot use when they were 24. The scientists were also able to track which participants...

Prostate Cancer Drug Could Be 'Game Changing,' Researchers Say

29 May 2020
FRIDAY, May 29, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- For men with advanced prostate cancer, a new hormone therapy pill works better than standard injections -- and carries a much lower risk of heart attack or stroke, a clinical trial has found. The drug, called relugolix, is not yet approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. If it gets the green light, however, it would be "game-changing," said Dr. Neal Shore, lead researcher on the trial. Hormone therapy has long been a standard treatment for advanced prostate cancer -- including cases where the tumor has spread beyond the prostate gland or recurred after treatment with surgery or radiation. The goal is to suppress androgen hormones, including testosterone, because they fuel the growth of prostate tumors. Right now, that's usually...

AHA News: Inherited High Cholesterol May Be Common in...

FRIDAY, May 29, 2020 (American Heart Association News) -- An inherited disorder that causes high cholesterol early in life appears to affect about 25 million people worldwide, but it is especially...

DVT Clots Strike Many Critically Ill COVID-19 Patients:...

FRIDAY, May 29, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- In a small French study, three-quarters of all COVID-19 patients admitted to intensive care went on to experience a dangerous blood clot in the leg that...
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