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1Jul
2022

Politics Big Factor in Folks' Decision to Get Boosters

Politics Big Factor in Folks` Decision to Get BoostersFRIDAY, July 1, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Who you voted for at the ballot box may have the most influence over whether you've gotten a COVID-19 booster shot.Researchers studying vaccine hesitancy two years into the pandemic found that political party affiliation was a key determinant of where study participants got their information about the pandemic and vaccines."Survey respondents who described themselves as conservative are the most hesitant toward the COVID-19 vaccine, while those who described themselves as liberal are more likely to have already received the vaccine plus one or both boosters," said lead researcher Agustín Vallejo, a postdoctoral fellow with the University of Houston's Hobby School of Public Affairs. He spoke in a school news release.The survey was conducted...

Tests Find Salmonella in Third of Store-Bought Ground...

1 July 2022
Tests Find Salmonella in Third of Store-Bought Ground ChickenFRIDAY, July 1, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one-third of ground chicken may contain dangerous salmonella, a new Consumer Reports investigation shows.Based on its findings, the group called on the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), which regulates the nation's meat supply, to redouble its efforts to protect consumers from this bacteria, which can cause serious illness."The USDA has pledged to reduce illness from salmonella contamination for more than a decade, but [Consumer Reports'] tests show that more progress is clearly needed to protect the public," said James Rogers, director of food safety research and testing at Consumer Reports. "We need tougher action by the USDA to keep salmonella out of our kitchens and off of our plates."Salmonella was found in 31%, or 23 of the...

Some Viruses Make People More Attractive to Mosquitoes

1 July 2022
Some Viruses Make People More Attractive to MosquitoesFRIDAY, July 1, 2022 (HealthDay News) – When a mosquito bites and infects you with a virus like dengue or Zika, it also makes you smell good to other mosquitos, new research suggests.That makes it more likely another one will bite, pick up the virus and carry it to the next victim.“The virus can manipulate the hosts’ skin microbiome to attract more mosquitoes to spread faster!” said study co-author Penghua Wang, an immunologist at UConn Health in Farmington, Conn.The findings could explain how mosquito-borne viruses persist for such a long time, researchers said.Both dengue and Zika are spread by mosquitoes and are in the same viral family as yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and West Nile.Dengue affects 50 million people a year and kills 20,000, mostly children, according to...

Stay Independent of Asthma, Allergies This July 4th

1 July 2022
Stay Independent of Asthma, Allergies This July 4thFRIDAY, July 1, 2022 (HealthDay News) – It’s time to enjoy summer celebrations, but allergies and asthma can put a damper on the festivities.They don’t need to. The American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) offers some tips for keeping them in check.“The 4th of July is a favorite holiday for many Americans because it’s in the middle of summer and folks can enjoy lovely weather with their festivities,” said allergist Dr. Mark Corbett, president of ACAAI. “But that doesn’t mean allergy and asthma symptoms won’t flare. Those with asthma need to be cautious at events where smoke will be featured. Smoke in any form – from fireworks, bonfires, or campfires – should be on the list of things to bypass.”If your celebrations will be outdoors and you have...

Supreme Court Curbs EPA's Authority Over Power Plant Emissions

30 June 2022
Supreme Court Curbs EPA`s Authority Over Power Plant EmissionsTHURSDAY, June 30, 2022 (HealthDay News) – In a ruling that will curb efforts to fight climate change, the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday limited the Environmental Protection Agency’s ability to regulate carbon emissions from power plants.The 6-3 decision comes as scientists are warning about the growing threat posed by global warming.It could potentially extend to other actions taken by administrative agencies, the New York Times reported.As with several recent high court rulings, the ruling came with the three liberal justices dissenting. They said the decision strips the EPA of “the power to respond to the most pressing environmental challenge of our time.”In her dissent, Justice Elena Kagan wrote that the court had substituted its own policy judgment for that of...

FDA Tells Vaccine Makers to Update Boosters to Target Omicron Subvariants

30 June 2022
FDA Tells Vaccine Makers to Update Boosters to Target Omicron SubvariantsTHURSDAY, June 30, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Thursday that it has asked vaccine makers to update their COVID-19 booster shots to target the Omicron subvariants known as BA.4 and BA.5.The two highly contagious subvariants now account for more than half of all new COVID cases in the United States."As we move into the fall and winter, it is critical that we have safe and effective vaccine boosters that can provide protection against circulating and emerging variants to prevent the most severe consequences of COVID-19," Dr. Peter Marks, director of the FDA's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, said in an agency news release."Vaccine manufacturers have already reported data from clinical trials with modified vaccines containing an...

Harnessing a Virus to Fight a Killer Brain Tumor in Kids

30 June 2022
Harnessing a Virus to Fight a Killer Brain Tumor in KidsTHURSDAY, June 30, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- A therapy that uses a virus to kill tumor cells can be safely given to children with a rare, incurable form of brain cancer, an early study has found.The study -- published June 30 in the New England Journal of Medicine -- involved just 12 children with the disease, called diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG).But experts said it demonstrates the feasibility of directly delivering the viral therapy to the cancer, which forms in the brain stem.Whether the approach can ultimately extend children's lives, however, remains to be seen.DIPG is rare, affecting between 200 and 400 U.S. children each year. There is no cure, in large part because of the nature of the cancer: It arises in a part of the brain stem called the pons, which controls bodily...

Cancer Survivors Face Higher Heart Risks Later

30 June 2022
Cancer Survivors Face Higher Heart Risks LaterTHURSDAY, June 30, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- If you survive cancer, you're more apt to have heart trouble later on, a new study shows.Researchers found that compared to others, cancer survivors had a 42% greater risk of heart disease, most likely due to damage resulting from cancer treatment."There are chemotherapies that can damage the heart, and radiation to the chest can also affect the heart," said lead researcher Dr. Roberta Florido, director of cardio-oncology at Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore. "So it's possible that these therapies, in the long run, increase the risk of cardiovascular disease."The risk for heart failure after cancer was particularly high: 52%. Stroke risk also rose 22%. There wasn't, however, a significantly higher risk for heart attack or coronary artery...

Will You Be Depositing at the 'Stool Bank' Someday?

THURSDAY, June 30, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Banking samples of your own poop in your youth and then transplanting them back when you're old might be a key to healthy aging, scientists...

AHA News: 8 Days After Giving Birth, 29-Year-Old Had a...

THURSDAY, June 30, 2022 (American Heart Association News) -- Noelia Gutierrez appreciated her mother traveling from New York to Florida to help with the arrival of her third child. One day,...
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