Latest Health News

13Oct
2023

Could Tissue-Zapping Procedure Be Non-Antibiotic Option for Recurrent UTIs?

Could Tissue-Zapping Procedure Be Non-Antibiotic Option for Recurrent UTIs?FRIDAY, Oct. 13, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- For some older women, recurring urinary tract infections — and the antibiotics typically prescribed for them — become a fact of life, but a new study offers a novel treatment that may deliver relief.Called electrofulguration, the minimally invasive procedure essentially zaps and eliminates inflamed, infected bladder tissue. In the study, it was found to be effective for a number of women plagued by the issue. Study corresponding author Dr. Philippe Zimmern, director of the John and Felecia Cain Center for Bladder Health at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, said he was interested in finding solutions because he saw so many patients who had taken antibiotics for bladder infections repeatedly before they were referred to him.“It was...

Doctor's Group Pulls Paper on 'Excited Delirium,' Often...

13 October 2023
Doctor`s Group Pulls Paper on `Excited Delirium,` Often Cited in Cases Involving Excessive Force by PoliceFRIDAY, Oct. 13, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- A paper that has been used in court cases to justify excessive police force was withdrawn Thursday by the American College of Emergency Physicians, a prominent doctor’s group.The paper, published in 2009, was on a condition referred to as “excited delirium.” “This [withdrawal] means if someone dies while being restrained in custody ... people can’t point to excited delirium as the reason and can’t point to ACEP’s endorsement of the concept to bolster their case,” Dr. Brooks Walsh, a Connecticut emergency doctor who pushed the organization to strengthen its stance, told the Associated Press. Walsh said the 2009 paper reinforced stereotypes. It said symptoms of the condition included unusual strength, pain tolerance and bizarre...

Abnormal Result on a Cancer Screen? Your Family Doctor...

13 October 2023
Abnormal Result on a Cancer Screen? Your Family Doctor Could Be Key to Follow-UpFRIDAY, Oct. 13, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Extra efforts by primary care doctors to reach out to patients who need follow-up after an abnormal cancer test result leads to better results in getting that care, a new clinical trial shows.The trial involved nearly 12,000 patients who were receiving care at 44 primary care practices. They had overdue abnormal breast, cervical, colon or lung cancer screening results.To study this, the practices and their patients were randomly assigned among four different groups.One group received the usual care. A second got an automated reminder in their electronic health records (EHRs). A third received the reminder and outreach in the form of a patient letter followed by a phone call. The fourth group got everything that the second and third groups...

Latest AI Has 100% Success Rate in Spotting Melanomas

13 October 2023
Latest AI Has 100% Success Rate in Spotting MelanomasFRIDAY, Oct. 13, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- The ability to detect skin cancer using artificial intelligence (AI) software has rapidly improved.New research presented Wednesday at a medical conference in Berlin shows that this AI technology now has a 100% detection rate for melanoma, the most serious form of skin cancer.In this study, researchers assessed more than 22,000 patients with suspected skin cancers over 2-1/2 years. Besides detecting all 59 cases of melanoma, the new software was 99.5% accurate in detecting all skin cancers, missing 1 of 190. It was 92.5% effective at identifying pre-cancerous lesions."This study has demonstrated how AI is rapidly improving and learning, with the high accuracy directly attributable to improvements in AI training techniques and the quality of...

When Lung Cancer Strikes the Young, Women Face Higher Risks Than Men

13 October 2023
When Lung Cancer Strikes the Young, Women Face Higher Risks Than MenFRIDAY, Oct. 13, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- New research uncovers troubling trends for lung cancer in young and middle-aged women. Cancer incidence in young women is higher than it is in men, a continuing trend, and now that extends to women over age 50, reversing historical patterns. “These findings are very concerning,” said study lead author Dr. Ahmedin Jemal, senior vice president of surveillance and health equity science at the American Cancer Society.“We don’t know why lung cancer incidence rates among younger and middle-aged individuals are now higher in women than men, reversing the historical pattern,” Jemal noted in a cancer society news release. “Cigarette smoking prevalence, the major risk factor for lung cancer in the United States, is not higher in younger women...

Human 'Brain Cell Atlas' Brings New Insight Into Brain Health, Illness

12 October 2023
Human `Brain Cell Atlas` Brings New Insight Into Brain Health, IllnessTHURSDAY, Oct. 12, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- After a massive five-year effort, researchers have unveiled an “atlas” that gives an unprecedented look at the intricacies of the human brain.The atlas, which will be available to researchers everywhere, can be seen as similar to the atlases we all know: a book of maps.But this one catalogues human brain cells and their striking diversity and complexity. Going forward, the atlas will help other researchers “navigate” the brain, said Bing Ren, a professor at the University of California, San Diego, who was part of the research effort.The atlas encompasses more than 3,000 types of brain cells, and gives insight into how they vary from one person to another, how they differ from non-human primates’ brain cells, how particular brain...

New Clues to How Inflammation in Young Children’s Brains Might Spur Autism

12 October 2023
New Clues to How Inflammation in Young Children’s Brains Might Spur AutismTHURSDAY, Oct. 12, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Severe inflammation very early in childhood might hamper the development of key brain cells, perhaps setting the stage for conditions such as autism or schizophrenia, new research suggests.The origins of many neurodevelopment disorders remain mysterious. But the new study of postmortem brain tissue from children who died between the ages 1 and 5 shows how inflammation affects brain cells.In their research, the team from the University of Maryland School of Medicine targeted a portion of the brain known as the cerebellum, using a cutting-edge technology called single nucleus RNA sequencing.“We looked at the cerebellum because it is one of the first brain regions to begin developing and one of the last to reach its maturity, but it remains...

A Bionic Hand Melds With Woman's Own Bone, Nervous System

12 October 2023
A Bionic Hand Melds With Woman`s Own Bone, Nervous SystemTHURSDAY, Oct.12, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Fifty years ago, the TV series “The Six Million Dollar Man” hyped a futuristic world of life-changing bionics with the stirring phrase: “We can rebuild him, we have the technology.”Cut to 2023, and researchers in Sweden appear to have delivered on that promise.A Swedish woman who lost her right hand in a farming accident more than 20 years ago has successfully been outfitted with a first-of-its-kind bionic appendage, a team of Swedish, Australian, Italian and American researchers reports in the Oct. 11 issue of the journal Science Robotics.Researchers said the science behind the technology is “groundbreaking,” because the artificial limb has fully integrated with the patient’s own nerves, bones and muscles in the years since its...

Young Adults, Black Americans Most Likely to Visit ER...

THURSDAY, Oct. 12, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Being young or Black may make it more likely that you wind up in an emergency room with an assault injury, new research suggests.Living in metropolitan...

Women With Acne Bear Another Burden: Stigma

THURSDAY, Oct. 12, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Adult acne can significantly change how women are perceived in social settings, a new study finds. And where the acne is located on the face changes the...
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