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27May
2020

AHA News: Altitude? Exhaustion? Then, She Remembered the Elizabeth Banks Video

WEDNESDAY, May 27, 2020 (American Heart Association News) -- On the final morning of a family camping trip, Stacey Bailey woke up and started cleaning. After a difficult night caring for her sick granddaughter, Bailey hauled a pile of vomit-soiled sheets and towels to the campground showers. Along the way, she felt nauseous and unusually exhausted. "Maybe it's the altitude or I'm out of shape," she thought. As she hung the wet linens from branches to dry, Bailey experienced a severe burning in her chest. Figuring the previous night's barbecued ribs were to blame, she chewed a few antacids. They didn't help. Soon, her jaw and neck began to ache. Bailey sat down, her head in a fog, unable to muster a response when a passerby commented on her Arizona license plate. That's when it hit her....

Mindfulness May Ease the Emotional Burden of MS

27 May 2020
WEDNESDAY, May 27, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Mindfulness training may help counter the thinking and emotional difficulties caused by multiple sclerosis. In a small test study, people with multiple sclerosis (MS) who had four weeks of mindfulness training emerged with better emotional control and faster thinking. Multiple sclerosis is a disease in which the immune system attacks the brain, spinal cord and optic nerves. This interferes with communication in the brain and between the brain and body, leading to worsening mental and physical problems. An estimated one million people in the United States are affected. "Emotional upheaval is part and parcel of living with multiple sclerosis -- there's no cure, per se," said Nicholas Larocca, a National Multiple Sclerosis Society...

Alzheimer's Gene Linked to Severe COVID-19 Risk

27 May 2020
WEDNESDAY, May 27, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- People who have a flawed gene linked to Alzheimer's disease may face a higher risk of COVID-19, an international team of researchers reports. Part of the increased risk among people with dementia may owe to high rates of new coronavirus infections in nursing homes. But this study suggests genetics may also be a factor. The APOE e4e4 gene variant is known to increase Alzheimer's risk up to 14 times. It also increases heart disease risk. Medical school researchers at the University of Exeter in England and the University of Connecticut analyzed data from more than 382,000 people of European ancestry. Of those, about 2.4% had the ApoE e4e4 gene variant. Meanwhile, 5.1% of those who tested positive for COVID-19 had the gene variant. While...

White House Announces Plan for Medicare Recipients to...

27 May 2020
WEDNESDAY, May 27, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Beginning next year, people on some Medicare Part D or Medicare Advantage Plans who need insulin will be able to access the lifesaving medication for just $35 a month, according to a new plan announced by the White House. In some cases, the cost may be even lower, President Donald Trump said at a Rose Garden news conference on Tuesday. "I'm proud to announce that we have reached an agreement to dramatically slash the out-of-pocket costs of insulin, [which is] so necessary for hundreds of thousands of seniors enrolled in Medicare," Trump said. He added that, "participating plans will cap costs at just $35 a month per type of insulin and some plans may offer it free." Tracey Brown, CEO of the American Diabetes Association (ADA), said,...

Coronavirus Cases Ticking Upwards in Nearly a Dozen U.S. States

27 May 2020
WEDNESDAY, May 27, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- A jump in coronavirus cases is being seen in nearly a dozen U.S. states, at least half of which reopened early, as the country's coronavirus case count neared 1.7 million on Wednesday. Though the overall national trend has been staying steady or dropping, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina and Tennessee are some of the states seeing upticks, The New York Times reported. All five states were among the first to loosen social distancing restrictions. To some degree, the increase in cases may be due to increased testing, but it also suggests that the virus's spread in this country is nowhere near over, the Times reported. In a sign that the mental health toll of the coronavirus pandemic is also on the rise, new Census Bureau data...

Lockdown Got You Down? Experts Offer Tips to De-Stress

26 May 2020
TUESDAY, May 26, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Though the physical health risks posed by COVID-19 are at the top of everyone's mind, experts warn the pandemic is also exacting a massive toll on mental health. So finds new research emerging on the mental health effects in China, where infection peaks and lockdowns have preceded the American experience by several months. For example, one recent study in the journal Psychiatry Research surveyed more than 7,200 Chinese men and women during the country's February lockdown. More than a third were found to be suffering from COVID-related "generalized anxiety disorder," while about a fifth struggled with signs of depression. Just over 18% reported sleeping difficulties. The good news? Experts say there are effective coping strategies for those...

Too Often, Bullying Has Lethal Consequences for LGBT Teens

26 May 2020
TUESDAY, May 26, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer (LGBTQ) youth who die by suicide are five times more likely to have been bullied than their straight counterparts. The finding stems from a review of nearly 10,000 U.S. death records for 2003 to 2017. All of the youth were between 10 and 19 years of age when they took their own lives. While LGBTQ youth are more likely to be bullied and report suicidal thoughts than their straight peers, researchers said this study may be the first to show that bullying is a more common precursor to suicide among LGBTQ people. "Clear and consistent evidence shows that LGBTQ youth are more likely to experience bullying -- including in-person bullying and cyberbullying -- than their heterosexual and cisgender...

After Heart Attack, Home Care Can Prevent a Return to Hospital

26 May 2020
TUESDAY, May 26, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Receiving home health care reduces heart attack survivors' risk of hospital readmission after discharge, a new study finds. In the United States, only a small percentage of heart attack survivors receive home care such as nursing and physical therapy, according to study authors. The findings were presented recently at a virtual American Heart Association meeting. Research presented at meetings is typically considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal. "Little is known regarding the impact of home health care on heart attack patients," lead author Muhammad Adil Sheikh said. "Since patients who receive home health care tend to be older and sicker than others, and these characteristics themselves can lead to hospital...

6 Expert Tips for Defusing Kids' Quarantine Meltdowns

TUESDAY, May 26, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- When kids and teens chafe under COVID-19 quarantine, how can parents stop the meltdowns and misbehavior? Start with understanding: Young people miss their...

Could a Hormone Help Spur High Blood Pressure?

TUESDAY, May 26, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Many people with high blood pressure may have an unrecognized hormonal condition driving their numbers up, a new study suggests. The condition, called...
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