Latest Health News

19Jan
2023

What's 'Code Blue'? New Study Finds Some Hospital Staff Mistake Emergency Codes

What`s `Code Blue`? New Study Finds Some Hospital Staff Mistake Emergency CodesTHURSDAY, Jan. 19, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital emergency codes are used to swiftly alert staff to something requiring a quick response, but a recent study suggests many health care workers can't accurately identify them.To learn more, researchers focused on five Georgia health care facilities. The study included 304 employees and codes for 14 emergencies. On average, participants could correctly identify emergency codes 44% of the time. The best-known codes were those for fire, infant abduction and cardiac arrest."The results of our study suggest a prompt response to such incidents is likely to be poor, as most employees were unaware of the meanings or actions of these notifications," co-author Morgan Taylor said in a University of Georgia news release. She is a doctoral student...

Preterm Birth Tied to Lower IQs, Poorer School Grades

19 January 2023
Preterm Birth Tied to Lower IQs, Poorer School GradesTHURSDAY, Jan. 19, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- By the time they're teenagers, babies born prematurely may be getting poorer school grades than their non-preemie peers.Researchers found that babies born before 34 weeks of pregnancy had lower scores on math and language tests during their teen years compared to kids born at 40 weeks.However, the study did not find a significant difference in later brain function in babies born between 34 and 39 weeks and those born at 40 weeks, according to the researchers, who included Anders Husby, an epidemiology researcher at Statens Serum Institut in Copenhagen, Denmark.For the study, Husby's team used data from siblings to study the impact of gestational age, while taking into account hereditary and maternal intelligence. The investigators focused on...

Some Athletes May Need an Extra Month for Concussion...

19 January 2023
Some Athletes May Need an Extra Month for Concussion RecoveryTHURSDAY, Jan. 19, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Some college athletes take longer to recover from a concussion, but a new study offers them some good news. They may still be able to return to play -- after one extra month of recovery, researchers report Jan. 18 in the journal Neurology."Although an athlete may experience a slow or delayed recovery, there is reason to believe recovery is achievable with additional time and injury management," said study author Dr. Thomas McAllister, from Indiana University School of Medicine. "This is an encouraging message that may help to relieve some of the discouragement that athletes can feel when trying to return to their sport. While some athletes took longer than 24 days to return to play, we found that three-quarters of them were able to return to...

Could Gut Bacteria Help Spur Parkinson's Disease?

19 January 2023
Could Gut Bacteria Help Spur Parkinson`s Disease?THURSDAY, Jan. 19, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- A recent study suggests that Parkinson's disease, in which parts of the brain are progressively damaged over many years, may actually start in the gut.Nearly 30% of the gut bacteria in patients with Parkinson's disease differed from those without the disease, according to the study from British and U.S. researchers. Study co-author Ayse Demirkan, a senior lecturer at the University of Surrey, noted that death and impairments due to Parkinson’s are increasing faster than any other neurological disorder worldwide. Diagnosed cases have more than doubled in the past 25 years."This is very concerning as there is no known cure," Demirkan said in a university news release. "However, the more we learn about the causes of the disease, the more...

Less Than a Third of Heavily Advertised Drugs Have 'High Therapeutic Value': Study

18 January 2023
Less Than a Third of Heavily Advertised Drugs Have `High Therapeutic Value`: StudyWEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Television ads for drugs are filled with glowing images of people living their best lives, all thanks to that new med they’ve been prescribed.But drugs being touted on TV often have little to no benefit compared to other treatments, a new study published online Jan. 13 in JAMA Network Open finds.Fewer than one-third of drugs commonly advertised in the United States are highly rated first-line therapies, based on regulatory reviews from three different health agencies, the researchers said.Further, medications categorized as “low benefit” accounted for nearly $16 billion of the $22 billion in TV ad spending during the six-year study period, the results showed.“Proponents of direct-to-consumer pharmaceutical advertising often argue...

Political News Takes Mental Toll, But Is Disengaging the Answer?

18 January 2023
Political News Takes Mental Toll, But Is Disengaging the Answer?WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- In today's highly polarized political environment, is it possible to stay up-to-date with the news of the day without getting totally stressed out?If not, is there a way to limit the emotional and physical fallout? Or is all that individual stress in service of a greater societal good?New research paints a complex picture with no easy answers.On the one hand, paying close attention to the daily doings of politicians does appear to have a way of making people feel consistently bad, investigators found. And those negative emotions appear to take a toll, they warn, in the form of poorer mental and physical health.On the upside, the study also found that staying politically informed appears to serve a larger good, motivating people to get more...

Appendicitis Often Spotted Later in Black Patients

18 January 2023
Appendicitis Often Spotted Later in Black PatientsWEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- While appendicitis is a common emergency, Black people experiencing its symptoms more often have a delayed diagnosis.But that doesn’t happen in lower-quality hospitals that serve more Black patients, according to new research. There, Black people are diagnosed more quickly.“There is clearly a benefit to patients being treated in predominantly minority-serving hospitals when they are having symptoms of appendicitis,” said senior author Dr. Anne Stey. She is a surgeon and assistant professor of surgery at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, in Chicago.Symptoms of appendicitis include sudden pain that begins on the right side of the lower abdomen; pain that worsens if you cough, walk or make other jarring movements;...

Is My Child Too Skinny? Advice on When to Be Concerned

18 January 2023
Is My Child Too Skinny? Advice on When to Be Concerned WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- While childhood obesity gets a lot of attention, some kids struggle with the opposite issue — they have trouble gaining weight.So, how can parents know if their child is “too skinny?”While the best resource is likely a child’s pediatrician, experts have also weighed in on the topic.“Underlying health conditions can result in children and adolescents being underweight. Additionally, underweight can indicate malnutrition,” the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention noted in a recent study about the prevalence of underweight kids in the United States.Just over 4% of children and adolescents aged 2 to 19 were underweight in the United States in 2018, according to the study.To help figure out if your child is too skinny,...

AHA News: ER Worker's Heart Stopped, Leaving Her 'the...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2023 (American Heart Association News) -- As a child life specialist in the emergency room of a children's hospital, Christi Eberhardt spent a Wednesday morning getting kids...

Kids' COVID More Dangerous When Co-Infected With RSV, Colds

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- As colds, flu and COVID continue to circulate this winter, a new U.S. government study finds that young children infected with COVID plus a second...
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