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20Feb
2018

Health Tip: Understanding Tonsillitis

(HealthDay News) -- If your child has had repeated bouts of tonsillitis (inflamed tonsils), he or she probably is a candidate for a tonsillectomy (tonsil removal surgery), the U.S. National Library of Medicine says. Tonsillitis occurs when the tonsils -- infection-clearing organs at the back of the throat -- swell as a result of a viral or bacterial infection. This can lead to trouble swallowing or even trouble breathing. Almost every child gets tonsillitis, most often when they are 2 years or older, the NLM says. Typical symptoms include: A sore throat that lasts more than two days. Trouble or pain when swallowing. Feelings of being very sick or very weak. If these symptoms become severe, seek medical care without delay.
Family History of Breast Cancer Matters, Even for Older...

Family History of Breast Cancer Matters, Even for Older...

19 February 2018
MONDAY, Feb. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Women with a family history of breast cancer remain at higher risk for breast cancer even after age 65, a new study suggests. The findings could influence screening...
MONDAY, Feb. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Women with a family history of breast cancer remain at higher risk for breast cancer even after age 65, a new study suggests. The findings could influence screening recommendations for older women, said researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center, in Washington, D.C. Age is the strongest risk factor for breast cancer. But having a mother, sister or daughter with the disease -- a "first-degree relative" -- can double the risk, the study authors said. "Family history of breast cancer does not decline as a breast cancer risk factor as a woman ages. The relationship didn't vary based on whether a first-degree relative's diagnosis was made in a woman age 50 or younger, or older than age 50," said study leader Dejana Braithwaite. This...
Obesity Might Cause Sudden Cardiac Arrest in the Young

Obesity Might Cause Sudden Cardiac Arrest in the Young

19 February 2018
MONDAY, Feb. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity and high blood pressure may play a much greater role in sudden cardiac arrest among young people than previously thought, a new study suggests. The findings...
MONDAY, Feb. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity and high blood pressure may play a much greater role in sudden cardiac arrest among young people than previously thought, a new study suggests. The findings highlight the need to screen for these risk factors at a younger age, according to researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. "The added benefit of such screenings is that early efforts to reduce cardiovascular risk are known to translate into reduction of adult cardiovascular disease," lead researcher Dr. Sumeet Chugh said in a hospital news release. He's associate director of the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute. Sudden cardiac arrest is caused by defective electrical activity. It is different from a heart attack, which is typically caused by blocked heart arteries....
Protecting Your Electronic Health Records

Protecting Your Electronic Health Records

19 February 2018
MONDAY, Feb. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- An electronic health record, or EHR, is the digital version of the paper records documenting your health care. These online records are an advance in health management in...
MONDAY, Feb. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- An electronic health record, or EHR, is the digital version of the paper records documenting your health care. These online records are an advance in health management in many ways. These records mean fewer and shorter forms to fill out at appointments. Your information gets to all of your providers so they can coordinate your care and prevent problems like harmful drugs interactions. You won't need to repeat tests for different doctors because they all have access to all of your results. And you can more easily access your records to better track your care. Electronic health records can improve: Your care and care coordination. Your role in your care. The accuracy of your diagnoses. Health care costs. But what about the safety of your...
Many Parents in the Dark on When Kids Should First See a Dentist
19 February 2018

Many Parents in the Dark on When Kids Should First See a Dentist

MONDAY, Feb. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- American parents are less likely to seek early dental care for their children if they don't receive guidance from a doctor or dentist, a new national survey finds. The poll of 790 parents with at least one child aged 5 or younger found that one in six of those who did not receive dental advice from a health care provider thought children shouldn't visit a dentist until age 4 or older. But the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Dental Association recommend starting dental visits around age 1, when baby teeth first emerge. "Visiting the dentist at an early age is an essential part of children's health care," said Sarah Clark, co-director of the University of Michigan's C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's...

Health Tip: Comparing Soap and Other Body Cleansers

19 February 2018
(HealthDay News) -- Traditional soaps are made by combining fats or oils with an alkali, such as lye. Most body cleansers, however, are actually synthetic detergent products, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says. There are very few pure soaps on the market today, the agency says. The product's ingredients and marketing determine how it's regulated, the FDA says. It offers these details: To be regulated as "soap," the product must be composed mainly of the "alkali salts of fatty acids," that is, the material you get when you combine fats or oils with an alkali, such as lye. Also, to be recognized as a "soap," those "alkali salts of fatty acids" must be the only cleansing ingredient. If the product contains a synthetic detergent, it's recognized as a cosmetic, not a soap. To...

Health Tip: Protect Baby from Whooping Cough

19 February 2018
(HealthDay News) -- Vaccination is the best way to prevent whooping cough, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says. Whooping cough (pertussis) is a very contagious disease that causes about half its victims aged 1 or younger to end up in the hospital, the agency says. The CDC offers these suggestions to help protect your baby: Vaccinate - Women pass protection to their babies when they get the whooping cough vaccine during pregnancy. Family members and caregivers also offer some protection by getting vaccinated. Babies should get vaccinated, beginning when they are 2 months old.
Lung Cancer One of Many Reasons Not to Smoke
18 February 2018

Lung Cancer One of Many Reasons Not to Smoke

SUNDAY, Feb. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- You already know that smoking causes lung cancer. But tobacco use can lead to other major health problems, too, experts warn. "Cigarette smoking is probably the single most harmful thing you can do to your health," said Jonathan Foulds, a professor of public health sciences and psychiatry at Penn State College of Medicine. "It's hard to find a part of the body not affected by it," Foulds said in a college news release. Besides its link to lung cancer, smoking is also tied to heart attack, stroke, diabetes and other types of cancers, the news release noted. As for lung cancer, "if you smoke a pack a day or more, your risk of getting lung cancer isn't just one-and-a-half or double that of a nonsmoker. It's 20 times as great," Foulds...
Stroke May Not Mean Language Loss for Newborns

Stroke May Not Mean Language Loss for Newborns

SATURDAY, Feb. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Strokes in babies may not have the same lasting effects as they do in adults, a new study suggests. Researchers from the Georgetown University Medical...
Sibling Bullying Could Have Mental Health Effects

Sibling Bullying Could Have Mental Health Effects

FRIDAY, Feb. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- People who, as young kids, either bullied their siblings or were bullied themselves by siblings face an increased risk for psychotic disorders, a new...
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