Latest Health News

17Jan
2020

Just 2% of Patients Who Need It Get Anti-Opioid Drug Naloxone

Just 2% of Patients Who Need It Get Anti-Opioid Drug NaloxoneFRIDAY, Jan. 17, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Naloxone can prevent opioid overdose deaths, but only a tiny percentage of Americans at risk are prescribed the lifesaving drug. That's the key finding from an analysis of nationwide data on adults with private health insurance. The researchers found that while naloxone (Evzio, Narcan) prescriptions in this group rose between January 2014 and mid-2017, only 1.6% of those taking high doses of prescription opioid painkillers had filled a naloxone prescription by the last six months of the study period. And the percentage of filled naloxone prescriptions was no higher among adults who had survived an overdose or had been diagnosed with opioid addiction ("opioid use disorder"), the study found. Naloxone can help reverse an overdose of many...

How Lack of Insurance Affects Breast Cancer Survival

17 January 2020
How Lack of Insurance Affects Breast Cancer SurvivalFRIDAY, Jan. 17, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Minority women with breast cancer are less likely to have insurance, which could lower their odds of survival, researchers say. "Having adequate health insurance for all could reduce the persistent racial outcome disparities in breast cancer," said study lead author Dr. Naomi Ko, assistant professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine. She added that early diagnosis is not only beneficial for individuals, but also for society as a whole to "decrease medical costs and promote equity among all populations." The researchers analyzed data from more than 177,000 U.S. women, ages 40 to 64, who were diagnosed with invasive stage 1 to stage 3 breast cancer between 2010 and 2016. The study found that whites were more likely to have...

Screening for Chinese Coronavirus to Start at 3 Major...

17 January 2020
Screening for Chinese Coronavirus to Start at 3 Major Airports: CDCFRIDAY, Jan. 17, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Travelers from China will now have to undergo enhanced screening at three major U.S. airports for symptoms of a new coronavirus that has caused an outbreak of pneumonia in China, federal health officials said Friday. The three airports -- San Francisco (SFO), New York (JFK) and Los Angeles (LAX) -- receive the most travelers from central China, officials explained. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is deploying about 100 health workers to supplement existing staff at CDC quarantine stations located at those airports, the agency said. The new coronavirus is genetically similar to MERS and SARS, two other coronaviruses that caused global outbreaks, said Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of the CDC's National Center for...

How Mom-to-Be's Worry Over Birth Defects Can Harm Baby

17 January 2020
How Mom-to-Be`s Worry Over Birth Defects Can Harm BabyFRIDAY, Jan. 17, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Hearing that your unborn baby has congenital heart disease can be traumatic, but now new research suggests that if you experience stress, anxiety or depression afterward it could affect your baby's brain development. Congenital heart disease (structural problems with the heart) is the one of the most common birth defects. "We were alarmed by the high percentage of pregnant women with a diagnosis of a major fetal heart problem who tested positive for stress, anxiety and depression," said study co-author Catherine Limperopoulos. She is director of the Center for the Developing Brain at Children's National Hospital in Washington, D.C. "We report for the first time that this challenging prenatal environment impairs regions of the fetal brain...

Do You Take Warfarin? Time of Day Might Not Matter

17 January 2020
Do You Take Warfarin?  Time of Day Might Not MatterFRIDAY, Jan. 17, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Patients taking the blood thinner warfarin have been told that it should be taken at night, but a new study found the time of day doesn't matter. "Whether warfarin is taken in the morning, or the evening, its therapeutic effect is the same," said lead researcher Dr. Scott Garrison, an associate professor of family medicine at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada. "Health care providers should stop telling patients to use their warfarin in the evening; rather, warfarin should be taken whenever regular compliance would be easiest for patients," he added. The drug is used to prevent blood clots that can cause strokes, heart attacks and blockages. It is also used to treat the abnormal heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation....

College Students Picking Pot Over Drinking in States Where It's Legal

17 January 2020
College Students Picking Pot Over Drinking in States Where It`s LegalFRIDAY, Jan. 17, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Are college students choosing marijuana instead of booze when both are legal? New research suggests they are: In states where pot is legal, college kids use it more, but binge-drink less. In states with legal marijuana, college students were 18% more likely to use it in the past month than in states where it's illegal, Oregon State University researchers report. From 2012 to 2018, the rate of pot users rose from 14% to 17% in states where it was illegal and from 21% to 34% in the states where it was legal. Using the National College Health Assessment survey from 2008 to 2018, researchers examined data on more than 850,000 students from 135 colleges in seven states where marijuana was legalized in 2018 and 454 colleges in 41 states where it...

Sepsis Causes Far More Deaths Worldwide Than Thought

17 January 2020
Sepsis Causes Far More Deaths Worldwide Than ThoughtFRIDAY, Jan. 17, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Sepsis kills more than twice as many people worldwide as once believed, and children in poor regions account for an excessive number of such deaths, researchers say. Sepsis is an out-of-control immune response to infection that harms organs. People who survive sepsis can have lifelong disabilities. In 2017, there were 48.9 million cases of sepsis and 11 million sepsis deaths worldwide -- that's one in five deaths that year. "We are alarmed to find sepsis deaths are much higher than previously estimated, especially as the condition is both preventable and treatable," said senior author Dr. Mohsen Naghavi, a professor of health metrics sciences at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle. Low- and middle-income countries...

Fewer Childhood Cancer Survivors Getting Hit by Heart Troubles

17 January 2020
Fewer Childhood Cancer Survivors Getting Hit by Heart TroublesFRIDAY, Jan. 17, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Since the 1970s, serious heart disease among childhood cancer survivors had declined remarkably, a new study finds. The decline suggests that efforts to make cancer treatments, including radiation, less toxic are paying off, researchers say. For the study, researchers led by Dr. Daniel Mulrooney, from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., collected data on more than 23,000 U.S. adults included in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study who had survived the most common childhood cancers. Specifically, the team members looked at heart failure, coronary artery disease, heart valve defects, damage to the heart tissue lining and heart rhythm problems. They also took into account risks for heart disease, such as diabetes, high...

Health Tip: Preventing Eye Injuries

(HealthDay News) -- One of the simplest ways to maintain healthy vision is to protect your eyes from injury, says the American Academy of Ophthalmology. About 90 percent of eye injuries involve...

Could a Switch to Skim Milk Add Years to Your Life?

THURSDAY, Jan. 16, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- If you want to slow down the aging process, it might not hurt to replace whole milk with skim, new research suggests. The study of over 5,800 U.S....
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