Latest Health News

11Oct
2021

Surgery Often a Gateway to Opioid Abuse, Study Confirms

Surgery Often a Gateway to Opioid Abuse, Study ConfirmsMONDAY, Oct. 11, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Surgery is a common gateway to opioid misuse that can put patients at risk of an overdose.That's the conclusion of a new analysis of data from nearly 14,000 adults who had surgery between 2013 and 2019 at UCLA hospitals. All were opioid-naive, meaning they had not filled a prescription for an opioid painkiller for up to one year before their surgery. Afterward, they were prescribed opioids to control pain and 21% refilled their prescription between three months and one year after their operation."The more than 100 million surgeries in the U.S. every year create an unintended and alarming gateway to long-term opioid use," said lead author Gia Pittet, a visiting graduate researcher for anesthesiology and perioperative medicine at the UCLA.Her...

Many Older Americans Who Should Be Checking Blood...

11 October 2021
Many Older Americans Who Should Be Checking Blood Pressure at Home Aren`t: PollMONDAY, Oct. 11, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- If you are over 50 and you have high blood pressure or a health condition for which blood pressure control is essential, at-home blood pressure checks can avert medical emergencies.The trouble is that too few of these people actually perform them, a new survey reveals."This poll shows that we have more work to do to encourage older adults with certain chronic health conditions to monitor their blood pressure," said Alison Bryant, senior vice president of research for AARP. "We know that the risk of high blood pressure increases with age, so this is an important topic for older adults to discuss with a health provider."The National Poll on Healthy Aging from the University of Michigan Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation surveyed more...

When COVID Triggers Loss of Smell, Younger Patients...

11 October 2021
When COVID Triggers Loss of Smell, Younger Patients Recover It SoonerMONDAY, Oct. 11, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Most adults who lose smell or taste due to COVID-19 infection regain those senses within months, but a quick recovery is more likely in those under 40, a new study finds.It included 798 participants in an ongoing survey who reported a loss of either sense after testing positive for COVID."We did see about an 80% recovery rate in a six-month period or longer. However, 20% is still a lot of people, given the millions that have been afflicted with COVID-19," said study co-author Dr. Evan Reiter, vice chairman of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine in Richmond.Along with age, pre-existing conditions also affected recovery of lost taste or smell. Those with a history of head injury and those...

Why Skin Cancer Checks Are Even More Important for...

10 October 2021
Why Skin Cancer Checks Are Even More Important for Hispanic PeopleSUNDAY, Oct. 10, 2021 (HealthDay News) – When Hispanic people get a skin cancer diagnosis, their tumors are about 17% larger than those of white people, researchers say. According to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), skin cancer is often diagnosed at a more advanced stage in people with black and brown skin, leading to worse results. This makes it especially important to know the signs of skin cancer. "Patients and the medical community need to be cognizant that skin cancer can develop in patients regardless of their race and ethnicity," said study co-author Dr. Laura Blumenthal, a dermatologist in Thousand Oaks, Calif., and colleagues.Their research found that Mohs micrographic surgery defect sizes -- an approximation of tumor size -- were larger in Hispanic patients than...

Going Cordless With Window Blinds Could Save Your Child's Life

9 October 2021
Going Cordless With Window Blinds Could Save Your Child`s LifeSATURDAY, Oct. 9, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Blinds and window coverings might seem harmless, but their cords can be deadly for young children and infants.The best way to keep children from becoming entangled in these cords is to replace your blinds with cordless versions, advises the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC)."Children have strangled to death on the cords of window blinds, shades, draperies and other window coverings, and this can happen in mere moments, even with an adult nearby," CPSC Acting Chairman Robert Adler said in a commission news release. "The safest option when young children are present is to go cordless."Strangulation can occur in less than a minute and is silent, so you may not be aware it is happening even if you're nearby. About nine children aged 5 and...

Study Confirms Rise in Child Abuse During COVID Pandemic

8 October 2021
Study Confirms Rise in Child Abuse During COVID PandemicFRIDAY, Oct. 8, 2021 (HealthDay News)– Physical abuse of school-aged kids tripled during the early months of the pandemic when widespread stay-at-home orders were in effect, a new study finds.Exactly what triggered the surge is not fully understood, but other studies have also reported similar upticks in child abuse. A pediatrician who was not involved in the new research suspects COVID-19 and pandemic-related stresses created a "perfect storm" for abuse."Stressful situations can be a trigger for poor judgment and impulsive reactions," said Dr. Allison Jackson, division chief of the Child and Adolescent Protection Center at Children's National Hospital in Washington, D.C. "There was a great deal of economic stress, job insecurity, and loss of housing potential during this time frame...

AHA News: Fasting During Ramadan May Lower Blood Pressure – At Least Temporarily

8 October 2021
AHA News: Fasting During Ramadan May Lower Blood Pressure – At Least TemporarilyFRIDAY, Oct. 8, 2021 (American Heart Association News) -- Every year, on the ninth month of the Islamic calendar, hundreds of millions of Muslims celebrate the month of Ramadan by, in part, fasting daily from sunrise to sunset. Now, new research shows it might help lower blood pressure – at least temporarily.The study, published Friday in the Journal of the American Heart Association, adds to the recent body of research suggesting health benefits associated with fasting.Study author Rami Al-Jafar and his research team evaluated 85 participants between the ages of 29 and 61 from five mosques in London, measuring their systolic (the top number) and diastolic (the bottom number) blood pressure before Ramadan and again right afterward.In addition, they asked the participants to keep food...

AHA News: Pioneering Hispanic Health Study Keeps Uncovering Trove of Info

8 October 2021
AHA News: Pioneering Hispanic Health Study Keeps Uncovering Trove of InfoFRIDAY, Oct. 8, 2021 (American Heart Association News) -- At first, there was skepticism about what would become the most extensive study of Hispanic and Latino health in the United States.But 15 years and nearly 400 scientific papers later, the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos is still producing valuable information.It's become a trove of long-term information that's as hard to gather as it is important, said Dr. Gregory Talavera, a professor in the department of psychology at San Diego State University. Even though Hispanic and Latino people are a large and fast-growing part of the population, "our knowledge of their health risks and their health resilience is not well-studied."Two years after the study's launch in 2006, an army of researchers began collecting medical...

CDC Urges Flu Shots as Survey Shows Half of Americans...

FRIDAY, Oct. 8, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- A new survey showing that nearly half of U.S. adults are not likely to get a flu shot this season has prompted federal health officials to urge all...

Stimulants Like Ritalin May Be Gateway Drugs for College...

FRIDAY, Oct. 8, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Use of stimulants among college students was once thought to be a problem among high achievers seeking energy and focus to study.Not so, according to new...
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