Latest Health News

14Jan
2020

Brake Dust Another Driver of Air Pollution

Brake Dust Another Driver of Air PollutionTUESDAY, Jan. 14, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Air pollution from brake pads may pose a significant respiratory health risk, British researchers say. "At this time, the focus on diesel exhaust emissions is completely justified by the scientific literature, but we should not forget, or discount, the importance of other components, such as metals from mechanical abrasion, especially from brakes," said study leader Ian Mudway, of MRC Center for Environment and Health at King's College London. "There is no such thing as a zero-emission vehicle, and as regulations to reduced exhaust emissions kick in, the contribution from these sources are likely to become more significant," Mudway said in a UK Research and Innovation news release. Brake dust is made up of metal particles from the abrasion...

More Than Half of Cancer Survivors Don't Abstain From...

14 January 2020
More Than Half of Cancer Survivors Don`t Abstain From AlcoholTUESDAY, Jan. 14, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. cancer survivors have surprisingly high rates of alcohol use, researchers say. "This study highlights the prevalence of current alcohol use among cancer survivors, including an increase in alcohol intake over time and higher rates among younger cancer survivors," said Dr. Crystal Denlinger, chief of GI Medical Oncology at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia. "As alcohol intake is a risk factor for cancer development and may contribute to worse outcomes following a diagnosis, this behavior is ripe for education and intervention in the survivor population," said Denlinger, who was not involved with the study. Alcohol is a risk factor for several cancers and contributed to almost 6% of cancer deaths in 2012, the researchers...

New Drugs Getting FDA's Blessing Faster, but Is That a...

14 January 2020
New Drugs Getting FDA`s Blessing Faster, but Is That a Good Thing?TUESDAY, Jan. 14, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- New drugs are being approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for patients based on less and less solid evidence, thanks to incentive programs that have been created to promote drug development, a new study shows. Researchers report that more than 8 out of 10 new drugs in 2018 benefitted from at least one special program that streamlines the approval process. The result is that patients are being prescribed pricey new medications that have not been tested as rigorously, said lead researcher Jonathan Darrow, an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School. "The evidence standards have changed, but it's not clear that physicians, let alone patients, understand either the basic FDA approval standard or that requirements have become...

1 in 4 Children With Autism Is Undiagnosed: Study

14 January 2020
1 in 4 Children With Autism Is Undiagnosed: StudyTUESDAY, Jan. 14, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Far too many U.S. children with autism are waiting too long for a diagnosis, new research shows, and those delays can greatly affect their quality of life. About one in every four 8-year-olds assessed in the new study was found to have undiagnosed autism and wasn't receiving autism services. Most of those kids were black or Hispanic, according to the report published online recently in the journal Autism Research. It's not clear why minority kids, especially, aren't getting the diagnoses and services they need, the investigators noted. "There may be various reasons for the disparity, from communication or cultural barriers between minority parents and physicians to anxiety about the complicated diagnostic process and fear of stigma," said...

Machine Could Expand Pool of Livers for Donation

14 January 2020
Machine Could Expand Pool of Livers for DonationTUESDAY, Jan. 14, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers report they have developed a machine that can repair injured livers and keep them alive outside the body for up to a week. They said the machine could one day increase the number of livers available for transplant and save the lives of many people with severe liver diseases or cancer. Until now, it was only possible to store livers safely outside the body for a few hours. But this new technology -- a complex perfusion system that delivers blood to the injured livers -- can extend safe outside-the-body storage of livers to up to seven days and offers a wide range of possibilities, including repair of liver injury, cleaning of fat deposits in the liver, and even regeneration of partial livers, according to the researchers from the...

Nearly 20 Years Later, Cancer Rates Higher in 9/11 First Responders

14 January 2020
Nearly 20 Years Later, Cancer Rates Higher in 9/11 First RespondersTUESDAY, Jan. 14, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly two decades after terrorists attacked New York's World Trade Center, certain cancers are striking police and recovery workers who saved lives, recovered bodies and cleaned up the wreckage. This particular group of responders appears to have an increased risk of developing thyroid cancer, leukemia and prostate cancer, as well as a slightly elevated overall risk of cancer, researchers report. Yet, "there is no evidence of an epidemic of cancer. There is evidence of increased risk for certain cancers among WTC-exposed responders," said lead author Moshe Shapiro, a biostatistician with the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. U.S. federal programs provide continuing care for the different types of rescue workers who...

What Works Best to Help Men With Overactive Bladder?

14 January 2020
What Works Best to Help Men With Overactive Bladder?TUESDAY, Jan. 14, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Learning how to control the urge to urinate may be all the therapy men need to treat an overactive bladder, a new study suggests. A combination of drugs and behavioral therapy seems to work better than drugs alone, but behavioral therapy alone also worked better than drugs, the researchers found. The trial of 204 men with overactive bladder suggests behavioral therapy may be a good way to start treatment, the study authors said. "The study provides good evidence that for the group of men with overactive bladder, symptoms without obstruction from an enlarged prostate can be successfully managed with behavioral therapy alone," said Dr. Manish Vira, who was not involved with the study, but reviewed the findings. He's vice chairman of...

AHA News: Researchers Listen to Rural Kentuckians – Then Score a Win for Heart Health

14 January 2020
AHA News: Researchers Listen to Rural Kentuckians – Then Score a Win for Heart HealthTUESDAY, Jan. 14, 2020 (American Heart Association News) -- Researchers who went into one of the nation's poorest regions to educate people about their health ended up getting a few lessons themselves – and together, they made some striking improvements. The effort targeted Appalachian Kentucky, an area in the eastern part of the state that's near the bottom in economic measures but in the top 1% for cardiovascular disease. Social conditions that contribute to poor health – food deserts, limited educational opportunities, lack of space for exercise – abound. A team from the University of Kentucky enrolled 355 people, most of them women, who had at least two risk factors for heart disease. Participants chose the factor they wanted to focus on, then took part in a 12-week self-care...

Good News for People with Persistent Anxiety

TUESDAY, Jan. 14, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- A diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder need not be a life sentence, a large Canadian study suggests. "It's so exciting," said lead author Esme...

More Studies Link Vaping to Asthma, COPD

TUESDAY, Jan. 14, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Lung illnesses and deaths from vaping have been grabbing headlines for months, and now two new studies offer fresh evidence pointing to long-term...
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