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4May
2020

Sexual Victimization Persists in U.S. Military for LGBTQs: Study

Sexual Victimization Persists in U.S. Military for LGBTQs: StudyMONDAY, May 4, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Lesbian, gay and bisexual members in the U.S. military are at higher risk for sexual harassment, sexual assault and stalking, a new study reports. And that sexual victimization can trigger mental health problems such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, substance use and suicidal behavior, researchers say. They surveyed 544 active-duty U.S. service members, including 41% who identified as LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and/or questioning), and 10% who identified as trans or gender-nonconforming. Those who identified as gay, lesbian or bisexual were more likely to report sexual harassment, stalking and sexual assault than heterosexuals. Gay and bisexual men were much more likely to report sexual harassment than straight...

Common Treatment May Not Help Seniors With Underactive...

4 May 2020
Common Treatment May Not Help Seniors With Underactive ThyroidMONDAY, May 4, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The medication Synthroid (levothyroxine) is often used to treat a condition called subclinical hypothyroidism, but a new study suggests the treatment might be a waste of time. For the study, researchers followed 638 people aged 65 and older with subclinical hypothyroidism, also known as mild thyroid failure. About half of the patients were given the medication, and half were given an inactive placebo. After one year, there was no difference in symptoms between the participants who received levothyroxine and those who received the placebo, the investigators found. "Levothyroxine is one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in the U.S.," said lead study author Dr. Maria de Montmollin, from the University of Bern in Switzerland. But she...

Loving Family May Lower Future Depression Risk in Kids

4 May 2020
Loving Family May Lower Future Depression Risk in KidsMONDAY, May 4, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Having a supportive family can significantly reduce a child's future risk of major depression, according to a new study. Researchers analyzed data on more than 3,200 pairs of siblings in Sweden -- including more than 600 pairs of full siblings and nearly 2,600 pairs of half-siblings -- who had at least one biological parent with depression. Each pair of siblings was raised apart, one at home and one adopted into a home with parents who could "provide a supportive and generally advantaged home for their adoptive child." Being raised by an adoptive family in a supportive environment was associated with a 23% decrease in the risk of treated major depression among full siblings and a 19% decreased risk among half-siblings. However, the reduction...

Sleep Apnea Tied to Raised Diabetes Risk in Black Americans

4 May 2020
Sleep Apnea Tied to Raised Diabetes Risk in Black AmericansMONDAY, May 4, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Black Americans with severe sleep apnea and other sleep problems are at increased risk for high blood sugar levels that can lead to diabetes, a new study finds. The researchers examined sleep patterns and blood sugar (glucose) of 789 men and women, average age 63, enrolled in the Jackson Heart Study, the largest study of cardiovascular disease in black Americans. One-quarter of participants had type 2 diabetes; 20% were taking diabetes medications; and 57% had been diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea but were not being treated for it. Those with severe apnea had 14% higher fasting blood glucose levels than those without sleep apnea, the findings showed. Severe sleep apnea was also associated with higher HbA1c levels. HbA1C is a measure of...

AHA News: More Intense Blood Pressure Control May Lower Irregular Heartbeat Risk

4 May 2020
AHA News: More Intense Blood Pressure Control May Lower Irregular Heartbeat RiskMONDAY, May 4, 2020 (American Heart Association News) -- Aggressively treating high blood pressure might reduce the risk of a type of irregular heartbeat, according to a new study. Atrial fibrillation, or AFib, can lead to stroke, heart failure and other cardiovascular complications. The condition is on the rise, with an estimated 12.1 million Americans expected to have it in 2030. The most common modifiable risk factor for AFib is high blood pressure, which affects 46% of U.S. adults. The study, published Monday in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension, sought to find out if intensively lowering a person's blood pressure to normal might prevent them from developing AFib. The study included 8,022 people who had high blood pressure and were at increased risk of...

FDA Goes After Unproven COVID-19 Antibody Tests

4 May 2020
FDA Goes After Unproven COVID-19 Antibody TestsMONDAY, May 4, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Monday it will crack down on the fraudulent COVID-19 antibody tests that have flooded the market. Companies selling coronavirus antibody tests will be required to submit data proving accuracy within the next 10 days, or their products could be yanked from public circulation, FDA officials said. Since mid-March, dozens of manufacturers have been allowed to sell antibody tests without providing any evidence they are accurate, under the initial policy announced by the FDA. The intent of the initial policy was to support "the availability of antibody tests, which are an important tool in our fight against the coronavirus," FDA Commissioner Dr. Stephen Hahn explained during a media...

High Blood Pressure May Affect More Pregnant Women Than Thought: Study

4 May 2020
High Blood Pressure May Affect More Pregnant Women Than Thought: StudyMONDAY, May 4, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Twice as many women who have high blood pressure during pregnancy may be at an increased risk for heart and kidney disease than once thought, a new study suggests. For the study, researchers collected data on more than 9,800 pregnancies among more than 7,500 women in Olmsted County, Minn., who gave birth between 1976 and 1982. During that time, 659 women had 719 high blood pressure disorders during pregnancy, including preeclampsia, a serious complication marked by high blood pressure and signs of organ damage. Women under age 20 and older than 35 had the highest rates of preeclampsia and gestational hypertension. Over 36 years of follow-up, 571 women with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) developed a chronic condition such as...

More Symptoms of Coronavirus: COVID Toes, Skin Rashes

4 May 2020
More Symptoms of Coronavirus: COVID Toes, Skin RashesMONDAY, May 4, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The virus that causes COVID-19 typically strikes the lungs with full force, but new research shows it can also cause frostbite-like patches on the hands and toes, and rashes on the body. The condition has recently been dubbed "COVID toes." Fortunately, it isn't serious and the lesions usually disappear on their own, said Dr. Esther Freeman, director of Global Health Dermatology at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. "One of the more surprising findings in this epidemic has been the lesions that we're seeing on people's toes and hands," she said. Freeman noted that COVID toes aren't caused by exposure to cold, as is frostbite or chilblains. Rather it seems to be an inflammation of the circulatory system that shows up as a skin rash....

Can Survivors Get Reinfected With Coronavirus?

MONDAY, May 4, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- People all over the globe who've recovered from the new coronavirus want to know the same thing: Am I immune, at least for a while? A new study of common...

AHA News: Is It Safe to Go to the Hospital During...

MONDAY, May 4, 2020 (American Heart Association News) -- When concerns about catching the coronavirus encourage people to stay physically distant, that's healthy. When those fears drive ailing...
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